April 24, 2019

Episode 29 Bold Voice

“The point of being a leader is to inspire others to do things they think are right,” says University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO) Student Regent Renata Valquier Chavez during the Bold Voices student segment of Episode 29.

Renata, a third-year biotechnology and political science student at the UNO, digs deep into leadership and her experience at the University of Nebraska as an honors student, a student-athlete and the student body president.

April 24, 2019

Episode 29

Episode 29 of the Rural Futures Podcast is LIVE 🔥with quantitative futurist Amy Webb! Amy is also professor of strategic foresight at the New York University Stern School of Business, an award-winning author and the Founder of The Future Today Institute 🔮

During the episode, Dr. Connie and Amy talk about artificial intelligence, futurism, change, now-est mentality and community ✨

UNO Student Regent joins Rural Futures Podcast Episode 29 as Bold Voice

 

April 24, 2019 — “My leadership philosophy is to always lead by example and to not see yourself as higher than anyone else,” said Renata Valquier Chavez, a third-year biotechnology and political science student at the University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO).

Originally from Sidney, Iowa, Valquier Chavez moved to Elkhorn, Neb., during high school and decided to stay in Omaha, Neb., for her college experience. She is a member of the UNO Honors Program and a student-athlete on the UNO cross country and track team, and she spent the past year as the student body president and the student regent at UNO.

Valquier Chavez shared her University of Nebraska experience during the Bold Voices student segment of the Rural Futures Podcast Episode 29 at 22:51. The weekly podcast, “Rural Futures with Dr. Connie,” debuts every Tuesday, featuring a University of Nebraska student within a primary interview of a researcher, futurist or rural maverick creating leadership, technology and collaborative opportunities for rural communities across the country. This episode features Amy Webb, an award-winning author and professor of strategic foresight at the New York University Stern School of Business, and it is available across listening platforms — iTunes, Stitcher, SoundCloudGoogle Play and Spotify.

“I think UNO is an absolutely spectacular university,” she said. “My vision for our future students is to have the sense of pride to be at the university that they are at, regardless of which campus it is within the University of Nebraska.”

Valquier Chavez believes that teamwork is crucial to her success as UNO Student Regent and Student Body President, as well as an honors student and a student-athlete. “I believe that it’s a group effort wherever it is that you’re leading, whether it’s on the cross country team or within student government,” she said.

“The point of being a leader is to inspire others to do things they think are right,” she said. “I see myself in this position to encourage my colleagues to go after tough projects and to tackle controversial issues,” she continued.

She shared her advice for college students, which included time management, living intentionally and finding joy. “I think it’s so important to remember that you’re doing this all by choice,” she said.

“When you’re in an elected position, you’re not doing it for yourself,” she said. “You are in a position to serve others,” she added.

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About the Rural Futures Institute at the University of Nebraska The Rural Futures Institute (RFI) at the University of Nebraska leverages the talents and research-based expertise from across the NU system on behalf of rural communities in Nebraska, the U.S. and around the world. Through a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship, RFI encourages bold and futuristic approaches to address rural issues and opportunities. It works collaboratively with education, business, community, non-profit, government and foundation partners to empower rural communities and their leaders. ruralfutures.nebraska.edu

April 22, 2019

Earth Day!

Happy Earth Day rural listeners! Today’s holiday was originally created to educate the world about the environmental movement and motivate others to help make positive change 🌟🌎

Today is a great day for reflection on what has been happening with the #NebraskaFlood although it has brought so much destruction, it has also brought together communities and a feeling of hope that has made them stronger 💚

April 19, 2019

Episode 28

Episode 28 of The Rural Futures Podcast features Executive Director of the Greater Fremont Development Council, Garry Clark ⭐️Garry intersects workforce development, quality of life, fighting through fear 💪

Since Dr.Connie and Garry’s conversation, Fremont, Neb., and much of Northeast Nebraska has been significantly impacted by flooding in March 2019. Lives were lost and Nebraska’s damage is estimated at $1.8 billion. We touched base with Garry, and he says Fremont is in recovery mode. He urges listeners to donate to the American Red Cross ❤️(link below!)

Red Cross

April 19, 2019

Episode 28

On Episode 28 of The Rural Futures Podcast, Dr. Connie talked with Garry Clark, the Executive Director of the Greater Fremont Development Council. One of Garry’s ideals is finding opportunity when fighting through fear👊– he did this when he moved from Washington, D.C., projects where he witnessed drug addiction to Nebraska to accept a track scholarship. And because of that leap he took, Garry discovered his love for rural Nebraska 💚

Garry is also the author of the book “Unlikely Viking: From the D.C. Projects to Rural Nebraska”– check out the link below!

Unlikely Viking

April 17, 2019

Episode 28

Have you heard?! Episode 28 of the Rural Futures Podcast is LIVE with special guest Garry Clark, Executive Director of the Greater Fremont Development Council 🔥

“For 40 years or so, we’ve been smoke stack chasing — we’ve been looking for that big win that’s supposed to permeate our lives in rural places. And we’ve come to the realization that the only thing that sustains rural life are the people, and how we engage those people.”

April 18, 2019

Episode 28 Bold Voice

“If we can keep people healthier, we’re going to be more prosperous as a state,” says University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) Student Regent Sarah Hotovy during the Bold Voices student segment of Episode 28.

Hotovy, a third-year medical center at UNMC from York, Neb., digs deep into rural healthcare. She hopes to dedicate her career to affordable healthcare for both rural and urban residents in Nebraska and beyond.

UNMC Student Regent discusses Rural Healthcare on Rural Futures Podcast

 

April 17, 2019 — “The University of Nebraska is an incredible institution,” said Sarah Hotovy, a third-year medical student at the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) from York, Neb. “It’s thriving, and it’s got incredible leadership that we’re really lucky to have,” she added.

Hotovy shared her experience as UNMC Student Regent and Student Senate President during the Bold Voices student segment of the Rural Futures Podcast Episode 28 at 15:47. The weekly podcast, “Rural Futures with Dr. Connie,” debuts every Tuesday, featuring a University of Nebraska student within a primary interview of a researcher, futurist or rural maverick creating leadership, technology and collaborative opportunities for rural communities across the country. This episode features Garry Clark, Executive Director of the Greater Fremont Development Council in Fremont, Neb., and it is available across listening platforms — iTunes, Stitcher, SoundCloudGoogle Play and Spotify.

After earning her bachelor’s degree in political science and biochemistry from Nebraska Wesleyan University, Hotovy spent a year in Indonesia teaching English as a Fulbright Scholar. She became UNMC’s Student Regent and Student Senate President during her second year at the Medical Center, and she is honored to have the opportunity to connect with and represent her peers.

“I like to lead through serving others,” Hotovy said of her servant-leadership style. “My goal through leadership is to see other people be successful and do what I can to help them be successful.” By encouraging and supporting her followers, she tries to help them reach their full potential and accomplish their goals.

Hotovy hopes to dedicate her career to affordable healthcare access for both rural and urban residents. “Regardless if they live in a town of three people or 300,000 people, I think that everyone deserves access to high-quality medical care,” she said. “If we can keep people healthier, we’re going to be more prosperous as a state,” she continued.

According to Hotovy, much of her success can be attributed to the University of Nebraska. “I really felt empowered at UNMC, not only to develop my skills so that I can be an excellent clinician and take good care of patients, but also to be a leader in the future of healthcare,” she said.

“So much happening at UNMC is groundbreaking, and it has really inspired me to make sure that I’m doing the same with my career,” she added.

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About the Rural Futures Institute at the University of Nebraska The Rural Futures Institute (RFI) at the University of Nebraska leverages the talents and research-based expertise from across the NU system on behalf of rural communities in Nebraska, the U.S. and around the world. Through a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship, RFI encourages bold and futuristic approaches to address rural issues and opportunities. It works collaboratively with education, business, community, non-profit, government and foundation partners to empower rural communities and their leaders. ruralfutures.nebraska.edu

April 15, 2019

Episode 27

Before we launch Episode 28 of the Rural Futures Podcast tomorrow, make sure to catch up on Episode 27 with Larkin Powell, professor of conservation biology and animal ecology in the School of Natural Resources at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Larkin teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on wildlife management and research, and his research program focuses on landscape dynamics, animal demography and movements and decisions made by private landowners in the Great Plains and throughout the world. He has taught at UNL for 18 years, during which time he was a Fulbright Scholar in Namibia.