Research/Technology/

Addressing the Rural Shortage of Mental Health Providers Through a Virtual Mentorship Network

December 5, 2017
Teaching & Engagement, 2014 Summary The state of Nebraska is facing a critical shortage of mental health providers. In 2011, 88 of Nebraska’s 93 counties were federally-designated behavioral health professional shortage areas. Immediate intervention is required to address the shortage …

Teaching & Engagement, 2014


Summary

The state of Nebraska is facing a critical shortage of mental health providers. In 2011, 88 of Nebraska’s 93 counties were federally-designated behavioral health professional shortage areas. Immediate intervention is required to address the shortage of mental health professionals in rural areas. Therefore, the objective of this project was to engage and connect students and members of their communities with mentor relationships. A virtual mentorship community of rural students and professionals throughout Nebraska was developed. The program recruited dynamic behavioral health professionals from rural underserved areas throughout the state to partner with interested students at the high school or undergraduate level. Students partnered with mentors from two different mental health professions; psychiatry and psychology.

The long term outcomes of this project include the placement of behavioral health professionals in rural communities, and connecting them to a culture of mentorship. In short, families and rural primary care providers would be able to connect to a local psychiatrist, psychologist, psychiatric nurse, or therapist so that they would not need to leave the community for care.

Impacts

Leaders in Nebraska are seeking solutions to critical shortages in the behavioral health workforce. The shortage is particularly acute in rural areas where there is a limited supply of practicing mental health providers to serve as role models for youth as they explore career paths. The development of a virtual mentoring network (VMN) may bridge geographic gaps and connect interested high school and college students with behavioral health practitioners to increase the number of applicants to graduate programs from underserved areas. The VMN program was rated to be helpful in both years of the project, but significantly more helpful in year two when college students were provided with tailored and career-specific information. These results suggest that separating high school and college mentoring cohorts due to different career counseling needs and allowing students to specify which licensed behavioral health professional they engage can increase the student satisfaction with an online mentoring program.  This pilot can serve as a model for other states that have significant workforce shortages in rural and urban underserved areas, as well as a model for additional behavioral health careers in which shortages are observed.

This mentorship program in the college-aged, small-group format will continue in the future. Efforts will be made to establish a sustainable program through which professionals in the behavioral health fields are able to provide career-specific guidance to mentees interested in the behavioral health career pathways. Dynamic professionals or advanced students will be recruited to serve as mentors to college students. Additionally, future work will include applying the successful VMN approach to additional behavioral health careers, such as social work, marriage and family counseling, and substance abuse counseling.

The videos created as a part of VMN are a permanent product and will be used to distribute basic career information to high school students through a variety of outlets, described above. Additionally, further outlets for the videos created for high school students will be sought, and distribution will continue as additional outlets are identified.

Project Team

  • Howard Liu (PI), University of Nebraska Medical Center, Behavioral Health Education Center of Nebraska
  • Heidi Keeler (Co-PI), University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Nursing
  • Ann Kraft, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Behavioral Health Education Center of Nebraska
  • Kay Glidden, University of Nebraska at Kearney, Behavioral Health Education Center of Nebraska

Partners

  • University of Nebraska at Kearney
  • Munroe Meyer Institute at UNMC
  • University of Nebraska at Omaha
  • University of Nebraska–Lincoln
  • Psychiatry Residency Program, Creighton University
  • Wayne State College
  • Doane University
  • Grand Island High School
  • Kearney Senior High School
  • Lexington High School

Publications

Videos

Presentation

  • National Council for Behavioral Health Conference
    Addressing the Rural Shortage of Mental Health Providers
    April 20-22, 2015 | Orlando, FL

Media Coverage

 

Contact: Howard Liu, hyliu@unmc.edu

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Translating Evidence-based, Family-based Pediatric Obesity Treatment Program for Adoption by Rural Communities

December 5, 2017
Research & Engagement, 2015 Summary National data have clearly documented a fourfold increase in childhood obesity during the past four decades. Pediatric obesity is associated with a plethora of health risks, yet obesity treatment programs are scarce in Nebraska and …

Research & Engagement, 2015


Summary

National data have clearly documented a fourfold increase in childhood obesity during the past four decades. Pediatric obesity is associated with a plethora of health risks, yet obesity treatment programs are scarce in Nebraska and generally unavailable in rural America. With US medical health care services changing to population-based health and evidence-based medicine, physicians are searching for tested and proven referral programs to provide health education and weight loss programs for children and adults, which achieve positive health outcomes.

The objective of this proposal is to enhance rural access to our locally successful, evidence-based, family-based, pediatric obesity treatment program, Building Healthy Families. Program translation will utilize distance learning technologies (synchronous and asynchronous) to allow rural community members in Greater Nebraska, where currently available resources and expertise are limited, to participate in the 12-week program.

Impacts

The project was deemed a success because a tremendous amount was learned about video conferencing delivery to rural families in an intensive family-based obesity treatment program. The team was able to evaluate what worked, and what did not work, and developed ideas of how to take next steps to enhance reach and modify delivery. The team was able to collaborate with new investigators from UNMC who have experience and expertise with evaluation of community interventions. The ability to better analyze the data facilitated the development of a proposal for external funding.

The objectives for the pilot study in Broken Bow and McCook included evaluation of passive and active recruitment from pediatricians and public schools in an effort to reach more potential families. The secondary objective compared the traditional Building Healthy Families program to a workbook control that was delivered to the rural communities. It is anticipated that the workbook control will experience weight loss, although not as much. However, the workbook control allows reach into rural communities where resources are not present. We are awaiting completion of the final data to determine the effectiveness of the program delivery to rural communities.

Two additional funding sources of $18,000 and $150,000 have allowed this project to expand. While a proposal to NIH for $3.3 million was not funded initially, the project is addressing reviewer critiques with plans to resubmit the proposal in the fall of 2018.

Project Team

  • Kate Heelan (PI), University of Nebraska at Kearney, Kinesiology and Sports Sciences
  • Todd Bartee (Co-PI), University of Nebraska at Kearney, Kinesiology and Sports Sciences
  • Nannette Hogg, University of Nebraska at Kearney, Department of Communications
  • Bryce Abbey, University of Nebraska at Kearney, Kinesiology and Sports Sciences
  • Matthew Bice, University of Nebraska at Kearney, Kinesiology and Sports Sciences
  • Allan Jenkins, University of Nebraska at Kearney, Department of Economics
  • Ron Konecny, University of Nebraska at Kearney, Department of Management

Partners

  • Myra Stoney, Southwest Public Health District
  • Jesse Goertz, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Nebraska Extension
  • Kaiti George, Hy-Vee Dietician
  • Nancy Rogers Foster, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Psychology and Pediatrics
  • Jean Mandernach, Grand Canyon University, Center for Innovation in Research and Teaching

Presentations

  • American College of Sports Medicine National Meeting
    Attenuation of Excessive Weight Gain One Year Post Pediatric Obesity Treatment Initiation
    May 29, 2018 | Minneapolis, MN
  • American College of Sports Medicine National Meeting
    Public Health Impact of a Family-based Pediatric Obesity Treatment Program
    May 29, 2018 | Minneapolis, MN
  • Nebraska Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Annual Conference
    A Community Approach to Pediatric Obesity Treatment: Kearney Public Schools and Building Healthy Families
    April 20, 2018 | Lincoln, NE
  • International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Annual Conference
    Adaptation of a Family-based Behavioral Weight Control Treatment Program for Rural Midwest US Families
    June 7-10, 2017 | Victoria Canada
  • International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Annual Conference
    Interventions for Community Implementation: Process and Outcomes
    June 7-10, 2017 | Victoria Canada
  • American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting
    Self-Monitoring as a Predictor for Weight Loss in a Family-based Pediatric Obesity Treatment Program
    May, 2017 | Denver, CO
  • Central Nebraska Child Obesity Conference
    Signs of Progress: Kearney Public Schools & Building Healthy Families Pediatric Obesity Treatment Program
    December, 2016 | Hastings, NE
  • Rural Futures Institute Forum
    Pediatric Obesity Treatment Program for Adoption in Rural Communities
    September 27, 2016 | North Platte, NE

 

Media Coverage

 

Contact: Kate Heelan, heelanka@unk.edu

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Social Media Plans for Small Businesses & Local Non-Profits

December 5, 2017
Teaching & Engagement, 2016 Summary Many rural Nebraska small businesses and non-profit organizations do not have the expertise or resources to implement social media plans, which can limit their organizational reach. This project will implement a service learning component to …

Teaching & Engagement, 2016


Summary

Many rural Nebraska small businesses and non-profit organizations do not have the expertise or resources to implement social media plans, which can limit their organizational reach. This project will implement a service learning component to an existing course, where students work with organizations to develop and implement social media plans, in partnership with the Economic Development Council of Buffalo County.

 

Impacts

During the two-year project timeline, 60 small businesses and non-profit organizations from the Kearney area were assisted by over 700 UNK students who worked in teams to develop social media plans for the organizations. The service learning project was incorporated into a capstone course offered through the Computer Science and Information Technology department at UNK. A positive impact from this project is that the service learning component of students working with organizations and small businesses is well established into the course and sustainable in ongoing years.

Post assessment results show that of the 60 organizations and small businesses in the project, two requested to re-do their social media plan and all the others expressed satisfaction with their plans. While final surveys are still being collected, results will be published in the near future once results are analyzed.

The research goals of this project were to study the impact of the interventions in increasing implementation and sustained use rates of social media plans developed through service learning. A long-term study continues to evaluate the sustainable impacts of this project.

 

Project Team

  • Sherri Harms (PI), University of Nebraska at Kearney, Computer Science and Information Technology Darren Robinson, Economic Development Council of Buffalo County

Partners

  • Buffalo County Economic Development Council
  • 60 Kearney-area small businesses and non-profit organizations

Publications

Website: UNK Social Media Plan Assistance https://socialmedia.csit.unk.edu/index.php

 

Media Coverage

Class schools firms on social media | Kearney Hub, March 2017

 

Contact: Sherri Harms, harmssk@unk.edu

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Increasing Rural Civic Engagement in the Digital Age

December 5, 2017
Research & Engagement, 2017 Summary Much interest is being placed on the role digital platforms play on increasing civic engagement in urban communities. However, their role in rural settings is not understood as well—but just as critical. Rural areas can …

Research & Engagement, 2017


Summary

Much interest is being placed on the role digital platforms play on increasing civic engagement in urban communities. However, their role in rural settings is not understood as well—but just as critical. Rural areas can and should benefit from utilizing digital platforms to become more responsive and increase civic engagement. In working with communities in programs such as Marketing Hometown America, communication and engaging members were always identified as issues as well as the question of how to reach and connect with younger members of the community. This project seeks to increase civic engagement in three rural Nebraska communities by developing strategies and tactics for engaging in conversations online, as well as social media training, to assist rural communities in increasing and improving overall engagement.

Impacts

Three communities in Nebraska – Ashland, Nebraska City and Ravenna – were selected to serve as pilot communities for this project. Steering teams were set up in each community to work directly with project personnel. The service learning component of this project involved students from UNO’s Social Media Lab who worked directly in the communities to learn about each community’s current social media presence. Students then prepared reports and identified strategies and tactics to strengthen their competitiveness in the digital economy.

Once the community steering teams each developed a strategy plan to strengthen competitiveness in the digital economy based on the recommendations, each community began working on implementing the strategies. A community survey focused on measuring civic engagement was done at the beginning of the project and will be done again at the completion to determine whether the increased social media tactics increased civic engagement.

Ultimately, the goal is to leverage broadband applications to improve a community’s competitiveness in the digital economy, community readiness to address change and/or action, and increase civic engagement and strengthen social networks, so rural communities can better respond to 21st century issues.

 

Project Team

  • Roberto Gallardo (PI), Purdue University, Center for Regional Management
  • Jeremy Harris Lipschultz (Co-PI), University of Nebraska at Omaha, Department of Communication
  • Charlotte Narjes (Co-PI), University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Agricultural Economics
  • Connie Hancock (Co-PI), University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Nebraska Extension

Partners

  • Becky Vogt, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Agricultural Economics
  • Jessica Quady, City Administrator, City of Ashland (key community contact)
  • Amy Algood, Nebraska City Tourism & Commerce (key community contact)
  • Dena Dennison, Ravenna Economic Development (key community contact)

 

Publications

A Social Media Strategy Plan for Ashland, Nebraska https://drive.google.com/file/d/1gCyNTA1DiPKbF7t6QnlbbLK49iues4DS/view

Nebraska City – Red to the Core https://drive.google.com/file/d/1S8E5RhKZc9oBbo8uiRaCtIm0s5ZRfSb_/view

Ravenna, Nebraska Social Media Audit https://drive.google.com/file/d/1xLc93kdkGNLQsOZQWpoOM2WjXMB_TvWn/view

Increasing Rural Civic Engagement in the Digital Age: Initial Trust Survey – Ashland, Nebraska https://drive.google.com/file/d/1BgqB_CjgWGj4viopn34FfcE7_hIbLGG4/view

Increasing Rural Civic Engagement in the Digital Age: Initial Trust Survey – Nebraska City, Nebraska https://drive.google.com/file/d/1voh_x9T42r95dcxzKifmBdMPgeNGc2X2/view

Increasing Rural Civic Engagement in the Digital Age: Initial Trust Survey – Ravenna, Nebraska https://drive.google.com/file/d/1YMqYMg8i8u-knGkc8_Ze8TVRFqQTtWjP/view

Intelligent Community Checklist Report – City of Ravenna, NE https://drive.google.com/file/d/1txH0nQtNbctWmy3HYlDIIZNkjr3nIVK1/view

Intelligent Community Checklist Report – City of Nebraska City, NE https://drive.google.com/file/d/1hvprkWaMIHURWCuT8LRbTp8C9bpbuYMv/view

Intelligent Community Checklist Report – City of Ashland, NE https://drive.google.com/file/d/1i5JywQh5aQaTnHShGv-70Aeb6LTHu8i5/view

 

Media Coverage

All three communities had newspaper articles encouraging participation in the trust survey. In addition, communities social media to encourage participation. A sample below:

The Ashland Gazette: Trust Survey deadline extended http://www.wahoo-ashland-waverly.com/ashland/news/trust-survey-deadline-extended/article_efd19b2a-d6b8-11e7-9619-6b8f48f253e0.html

The Ashland Gazette: Nov. 14 deadline for survey http://www.wahoo-ashland-waverly.com/ashland/news/nov-deadline-for-survey/article_7d47d1c8-c006-11e7-9628-d74e6ca47e42.htm

 

Contact: Roberto Gallardo, robertog@purdue.edu

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Rural Sourcing

December 5, 2017
Research & Engagement, 2013 Summary The concept of “rural sourcing” relates to existing and start-up companies strategically locating operations in rural areas to reduce labor costs and increase employee reliability. This project built on a successful “cross-sourcing” model to recruit …

Research & Engagement, 2013


Summary

The concept of “rural sourcing” relates to existing and start-up companies strategically locating operations in rural areas to reduce labor costs and increase employee reliability. This project built on a successful “cross-sourcing” model to recruit University of Nebraska alumni back to rural Nebraska in targeted professional service occupations. Alumni from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln and Kearney campuses were sent several emails and one postcard regarding the opportunity. The first phase of this project was guided by existing research exploring the lifestyle expectations and career preferences of alumni who moved back to the western/Panhandle region of Nebraska. Interviews were conducted with several alumni who have moved back to rural Nebraska to understand their process and motivation. Secondary and primary data collected from this research directed the communication campaign content for alumni who opted in to receive information related to current job openings.  Several central Nebraska employers were engaged as partners to describe and promote their professional opportunities with limited success related to filling job vacancies. The project received significant regional and national press coverage and formed several new relationships with employers, two University Alumni Associations, and University outreach staff.

Xpanxion designed the platform for accessing the Alumni Association data, sending related content, and allowing subscribers to opt-in for receiving future messages. Xpanxion assigned marketing, web-site, and software engineering staff to design and host the online platform and manage the testing during the project.

Impacts

The results from this project were less than expected as none of the rural employers filled vacant professional positions as a result of the system. The project investigators planned and implemented an innovative program never attempted at this level of a statewide public-private collaboration. The innovative concept received significant national, regional, and local media resulting in positive awareness for the key organizational collaborators (i.e. Xpanxion, the Nebraska Alumni Association, the University of Nebraska at Kearney, and the Rural Futures Institute/funder).

This project was well suited as a seed, or pilot, grant funding recipients as partners were unaware of the best methods for implementation or what some results might reveal. Several major lessons were learned through the process, including the need to engage more partner companies as employers before any promotional campaigns to alumni were implemented. The initial promotional campaign should still be a personalized postcard as the target audience of working professionals receive many forms of electronic correspondence each day.  Collaboration with other secondary education institutions serving rural populations may also expand the reach and potential of this concept.  The project served its purpose as a pilot program as it engaged the public and private sector on a meaningful and innovative level and an overall good use of public funds.

Project Team

  • Shawn Kaskie (PI), University of Nebraska at Kearney, Center for Rural Research and Development
  • Paul Eurek (Co-PI), Xpanxion Technologies LLC
  • Shelley Zaborowski (Co-PI), Nebraska Alumni Association
  • Randy Cantrell, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Nebraska Extension
  • Odee Ingersoll, University of Nebraska at Kearney, Nebraska Business Development Center

Partners

  • Dena Beck, Center for Rural Affairs, Rural Enterprise Assistance Project
  • Mary Findlay, Nebraska Department of Labor

Presentations

  • Nebraska Extension Eureka! Conference
    Rural Sourcing
    March 17, 2015 | Omaha, NE
  • Rural Futures Institute Regional Forum
    Rural Sourcing
    October 9, 2014 | Broken Bow, NE

Media Coverage

 

Contact: Shawn Kaskie, kaskiesc@unk.edu

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Collaborative Capacity Building in Rural Nebraska Schools via Technology

November 17, 2017
Special Project, 2016 Summary There are long-standing barriers to services in rural communities including insufficient mental health services, cultural differences and stigma that make access to treatment options for mental and behavioral issues a challenge for students in rural areas. …

Special Project, 2016


Summary

There are long-standing barriers to services in rural communities including insufficient mental health services, cultural differences and stigma that make access to treatment options for mental and behavioral issues a challenge for students in rural areas. The long term goal of this project is to significantly reduce mental health disparities for rural children in Nebraska and increase rural schools’ capacity for delivering research-based family-school partnership programs to address mental and behavioral health problems among their students. The immediate goal is to develop and evaluate highly accessible, effective and sustainable solutions for rural schools and families to increase access to mental health supports, address rural students’ mental and behavioral health challenges and bolster academic success.

Impacts

A Teachers and Parents as Partners (TAPP) online training website was created, allowing the project to be available to schools across the state and beyond.

This study collaborated with rural Nebraska schools to help rural teachers and families work together in a collaborative problem-solving process known as Teachers and Parents as Partners (TAPP).  School specialists from three rural communities in Nebraska were trained to implement the TAPP process and recruited family-teacher dyads surrounding children with behavioral concerns to participate. Specialists implemented TAPP with these dyads, and received coaching via distance technology from the PI throughout the project. Systematic data collection on the acceptability and feasibility of TAPP were collected throughout the project. As well, following completion of the TAPP process, participants completed semi-structured interviews wherein they detailed their impressions of TAPP, and the impact on family-school partnership in their schools.

The TAPP process was tailored to the unique needs of rural Nebraska communities and TAPP training and coaching was adapted for distance technology (Web platforms for training and coaching) delivery. Local school specialists (e.g., school psychologists, school counselors) received the training and worked with a coach as they implemented TAPP in their schools.

The project was executed over two phases, with each objective achieved in collaboration with community partners. Phase 1 involved the establishment of new partnerships between the University and local rural education partners around the state of Nebraska. Phase 2 involved implementing TAPP in the rural partner schools to establish a proof of concept for moving forward.

Project Team

  • Amanda Witte (PI & RFI Fellow), University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Nebraska Center for Research on Children, Youth, Families and Schools
  • Susan Sheridan (Co-PI), University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Department of Educational Psychology; National Center for Research on Rural Education; and National Center for Research on Rural Education

Partners

  • Timothy Nelson, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Department of Psychology
  • Paul Springer, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Department of Child, Youth and Family Studies
  • Richard Bischoff, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Department of Child, Youth and Family Studies
  • Istiaque Ali, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Nebraska Center for Research on Children, Youth, Families and Schools
  • Tanya Ihlo, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Department of Educational Psychology
  • Rural schools and educators
  • Nebraska Department of Education

Publications

  • Sheridan, S. M., & Witte, A. L. (2018, January 15). Teachers and Parents as Partners Online Training Portal: Practitioner Training System.
  • Witte, A. L. & Sheridan, S. M. (2018, March). Family-school partnerships: Evidence-based foundations and practice. Featured session presented at the International Conference on Positive Behavior Support, San Diego, CA.
  • Witte, A. L., Sheridan, S. M., White, A. S., Bhatia, S. A., & Strong-Bak, W. (2018, February). Teachers and parents as partners: Translating an intervention for practice. Paper presented at the annual convention of the National Association of School Psychologists, Chicago, IL.
  • Sheridan, S. M., Holmes, S. R., Witte, A. L., Coutts, M. J., & Dent, A. (2014). CBC in rural schools: Preliminary results of the first four years of a randomized trial (CYFS Working Paper No. 2014-8). Retrieved from the Nebraska Center for Research on Children, Youth, Families and Schools website: cyfs.unl.edu
  • Sheridan, S. M., Kunz, G. M., Witte, A., Holmes, S., & Coutts, M. (2014). Rural parents and teachers as partners: Preliminary results of a randomized trial (R2Ed Working Paper No. 2014-4). Retrieved from the National Center for Research on Rural Education: r2ed.unl.edu

Presentations

  • Nebraska Positive Behavioral Interventions and Support Leadership Development Institute
    Collaborative Capacity Building in Rural Nebraska Schools via Technology (TAPP)
    June, 2018 | Lincoln, NE
  • International Conference on Positive Behavior Support
    Family-school Partnerships: Evidence-based Foundations and Practice
    March 28-31, 2018 | San Diego, CA
  • National Association of School Psychologists Annual Convention
    Teachers and Parents as Partners: Translating an Intervention for Practice
    February 13-16, 2018 | Chicago, IL
  • American Psychological Association Annual Convention
    Teachers and Parents as Partners
    August 3-5, 2017 | Washington, DC
  • Rural Futures Institute Regional Forum
    Collaborative Capacity Building in Rural Nebraska Schools via Technology: TAPP
    September 27, 2016 | North Platte, NE

Media Coverage

Project trains rural educators, encourages sustainability | UNL Newsroom

 

Contact: Amanda Witte, awitte2@unl.edu

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Using Crowdlearning for Leadership Development in Rural Communities

November 17, 2017
Research & Engagement, 2013 Summary Developing the next generation of leaders is critical for the success and survival of organizations and communities. Rural communities experience additional challenges due to limited populations and geographic dispersion. In Nebraska, leadership demand is high, …

Research & Engagement, 2013


Summary

Developing the next generation of leaders is critical for the success and survival of organizations and communities. Rural communities experience additional challenges due to limited populations and geographic dispersion. In Nebraska, leadership demand is high, as one out of six adults hold a leadership role. To address these challenges, our research team created a case-based learning curriculum for developing leadership skills.

The focus of this project was to deliver leadership training using open source collaboration technology to provide an accessible, engaging and useful leadership development program, and created opportunities to connect leaders throughout Nebraska. A nine-month, e-training program was developed for emerging leaders in Nebraska. The training program focused on soft skills (e.g., feedback delivery) embedded in case-based scenarios. The participants collaboratively worked on skill building assignments, and the participants showed significant increases in their meeting effectiveness and feedback delivery skills.

Impacts

The need for leadership development opportunities in rural communities is clear. The goal of this project was to address this need by creating a virtual leadership development program for emerging leaders in rural Nebraska using a crowdlearning platform. We recognized how advances in technology make it possible for leaders in rural areas who cannot easily meet to come together in an online setting to share experiences, ask questions and learn from one another. We paired this technology with case-based learning methods to develop both creative problem solving and interactional skills. We created the cases based on actual situations rural Nebraskan leaders have faced. Each case focused on one of the creative problem solving or interactional skills we aimed to develop. Participants engaged in discussion about each case once per month. Similar cases were provided before and after each session to assess changes in skill development.

Overall, participants showed gains in development for each skill except one.  Results and feedback from participants showed greater gains and more enjoyment from the sessions on interactional skills. Most notably, results from pre- and post-assessments showed participants’ leader identity, leader self-efficacy and motivation to lead all significantly increased. Thus, the program was deemed successful, however, we also noted ways in which it could improve. In the future, we would like to make improvements to this program by offering more avenues for discussion (e.g., including asynchronous discussion boards) and by including different skills. We would also like to compare differences in learning in a face-to-face setting compared to a virtual setting. We also believe we would see more significant results from analyses if we had a larger sample of participants. A larger sample would also allow us to analyze results at the group level.

Project Team

  • Roni Reiter-Palmon (PI), University of Nebraska at Omaha, Center for Collaboration Science
  • Gina Scott-Ligon (Co-PI), University of Nebraska at Omaha, Center for Collaboration Science
  • Douglas Derrick (Co-PI), University of Nebraska at Omaha, Center for Collaboration Science
  • Lynn Harland (Co-PI), University of Nebraska at Omaha, Center for Collaboration Science
  • Gert-Jan de Vreede (Co-PI), University of Nebraska at Omaha, Center for Collaboration Science
  • Susan Jensen (Co-PI), University of Nebraska at Kearney, College of Business & Technology
  • Robert Bernier, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Nebraska Business Development Center

Publications

  • Mitchell, K. S., Harland, L., Reiter-Palmon, R., Ligon, G., Derrick, D., Sands, S., Kocsis, D., & Alothaim, A. (2017, July). Soft skills training can work: A collaborative training program for leadership development. Poster presented at the twelfth annual conference of INGroup, St. Louis, MO.
  • Scheller, E., Royston, R., Reiter-Palmon, R., Sands, S. J., Kocsis, D., Alothaim, A., Ligon, G., Harland, L., Derrick, D. C., de Vreede, G. J., & Jensen, S. (2017, April). Leadership development though virtual teams and case-based discussion. Poster presented at the 32nd annual Society for Industrial/Organizational Psychology Meeting, Orlando, FL.
  • Reiter-Palmon, R., Sands, S., Kocsis, D., Alothaim, A., Ligon, G., Harland, L., Derrick, D., de Vreede, G.J., & Jensen S. (2015, Aug.). Self-perception of creativity and creativity training. Paper presented at the 123rd American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • Jensen, S., Reiter-Palmon, R., Harland, L., Sands, S., Scott-Ligon, G., Derrick, D., de Vreede, G.J., Alothaim, A., & Kocsis, D. (2015, March). Tough Love…or Killing a Dream? Case study presented at the MBAA Society for Case Research Conference, Chicago, IL.
  • Reiter-Palmon, R. (2015, Oct.). Using crowdsources for leadership development in rural communities. Paper presented at the Rural Futures Institute Conference, Lincoln, NE.
  • Sands, S., Kocsis, D., Reiter-Palmon, R., Alothaim, A., Ligon, G., Derrick, D., Harland, L., Vreede, G.J. de, & Jensen, S. (2013, Nov.). Using case-based learning for leadership development in rural communities. Poster presented at the annual Rural Futures Conference, Lincoln, NE. Poster received honorable mention in poster competition.

Presentations

  • Interdisciplinary Network for Group Research Annual Conference
    Soft Skills Training Can Work: A Collaborative Training Program for Leadership Development
    July 20-22, 2017 | St. Louis, MO
  • 32nd Annual Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology Conference Leadership Development Through Virtual Teams and Case-based Discussion
    April 27-29, 2017 | Orlando, FL
  • American Psychological Association Annual Convention
    Self-perception of Creativity and Creativity Training
    August 6-9, 2015 | Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • MBAA Society for Case Research Conference
    Tough Love…or Killing a Dream?
    March 25-27, 2015 | Chicago, IL
  • Rural Futures Institute National Conference
    Using Crowdsources for Leadership Development in Rural Communities
    October 21-23, 2015 | Lincoln, NE
  • Rural Futures Institute National Conference
    Using Case-based Learning for Leadership Development in Rural Communities
    November 3-5, 2013 | Lincoln, NE

 

Contact: Roni Reiter-Palmon, rreiter-palmon@unomaha.edu

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