Grants/

2017 Research & Engagement | Request for Proposals

November 30, 2016
2017 Research & Engagement Thank you for your interest in the 2017 Rural Futures Institute Research & Engagement Awards Program. As it is after 4:00 pm CST on Wednesday, March 15, we are no longer accepting proposal submissions. Up to four awards will …

2017 Research & Engagement

Thank you for your interest in the 2017 Rural Futures Institute Research & Engagement Awards Program. As it is after 4:00 pm CST on Wednesday, March 15, we are no longer accepting proposal submissions.

  • Up to four awards will be made with $75,000 maximum per award.
  • The project time period will not exceed 24 months.

If you have questions about the submission process, please contact Kim Peterson at kpeterson@nebraska.edu or call 402-472-9287.

The University of Nebraska is committed to establishing a transformative Rural Futures Institute (RFI). RFI's vision, mission and core values are the fundamental underpinnings for this request for proposals.

Vision

RFI will be a locally, nationally and internationally recognized leader focused on increasing community capacity as well as the hope and confidence of rural people to address their challenges and opportunities, resulting in resilient and sustainable futures.

Mission

Through a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship, the RFI mobilizes the diverse resources of the University of Nebraska and its partners to support rural communities and regions in building upon their unique strengths and assets to achieve their desired futures.

Core Values

The work commissioned and supported by RFI must be guided by the Institute’s core values:
  • Bold
  • Transdisciplinary
  • Innovative
  • Agile
  • Collaborative
  • Reflective
The purpose of RFI Competitive Awards is to foster the development of research and engagement work that addresses critical challenges and opportunities facing rural areas. These awards are to function as “seed grants” that are designed to lay the foundation for grant requests to funding sources external to the University of Nebraska or sustainable funding through other mechanisms such as fees and contracts. Although all of the core values underpin the RFI Competitive Awards program, successful proposals must explicitly address transdisciplinary and collaborative considerations both internal and external to the University. Transdisciplinary research uses a strategy that crosses many disciplinary boundaries to create a holistic approach. Additionally, if RFI is to be successful, it must create an environment in which deep and meaningful collaborative partnerships are the norm: across campuses; across departments and disciplines; and with external stakeholders such as other non-University campuses, communities, state and local government, trade associations, civic groups and the philanthropic community. Proposals that demonstrate meaningful multi-campus and appropriate disciplinary collaborations will score more favorably. These collaborative partnerships are the essence of engaged research or “engagement.” Engaged research establishes reciprocal relationships of mutual respect and understanding. The mindset and attitude must be one of doing research “with the community,” rather than doing research “for the community” or “to the community.” Finally, proposals are expected to be innovative and bold in their proposed action, partnerships and outcomes. It is important to note that the issues facing rural areas include economic considerations but not to the exclusion of other equally important considerations. Basic human services such as health care and education present both challenges and opportunities to rural people and places. Even broader considerations are the natural environment and the civic, cultural, design and artistic aspect of human and community development that cannot easily be counted and measured, nor justified only in terms of economic returns. RFI Competitive Awards encourages proposals in which progress and viability are defined by the triple bottom line of economic, social and environmental considerations.
  • University faculty and staff as well as Nebraska community members and non-NU higher education faculty/staff are welcome to apply; however, either the Principal Investigator (PI) or a co-Principal Investigator (co-PI) must be affiliated with NU and take responsibility for administering the award funds.
  • Collaboration with partners external to the University of Nebraska is strongly encouraged.
  • An individual may serve as the PI for only one proposal but may serve as a (co-PI) on one or more proposals.
Proposals will be reviewed by a panel that will include both academic and non-academic representation. This panel will prioritize applications for funding based upon the criteria provided in Sections V and IX of this RFP. Final approval of proposals to be funded will be made by the Executive Director of the Rural Futures Institute.
  1. Potential to result in contributions to and measurable outcomes consistent with RFI's vision and mission.
  2. Compatibility with RFI's core values, especially transdisciplinary, collaborative, innovative and bold considerations.
  3. Potential to increase competitiveness for future external funding that is consistent with the vision and mission of RFI.
  4. Matching funds are not required but may increase the likelihood a proposal will be selected for funding.
Proposals ultimately funded will have certain expectations of the PI and the key personnel including the following:
  • Recipients are expected to participate in a working group composed of the RFI Research & Engagement award recipients. It is anticipated this group will meet at least once per academic year to share ‘best practices’ and lessons learned around innovative and creative processes and strategies unique to the research and engagement work undertaken.
  • Recipients are expected to share their insights and findings at a variety of appropriate venues including conferences, such as the Rural Futures Conference, and in refereed publications. In addition, the PI is expected to work with both the RFI Director of Competitive Awards and the RFI Director of Communications on external communications opportunities (white papers, interviews, recorded presentation, lecture, webinar, etc.) to share project results/findings with the broader RFI audience.
  • Recipients are expected to actively pursue external funding sources and submit a proposal for external funding within 24 months following the initial RFI award. Failure to do so may disqualify the applicant from future RFI funding competitions.
  • A final report is required and due to the RFI no later than one month following the conclusion of the project.
  • The project should be completed within 24 months. Extensions are discouraged and will only be considered for extreme circumstances (6 months maximum).
Funds may be used for wages and salaries of faculty and staff (provided the award is not used to generate salary savings*), graduate and undergraduate students and other key personnel; as well as operating expenses such as databases, supplies and travel that are directly related to the project.

Funds may not be used for any of the following purposes:

  • Indirect costs
  • To replace current funding*;
  • Remodeling, renovation or construction;
  • Recruitment or start-up packages for new hires; and
  • Items for purposes not exclusive to the project, such as desktop or laptop computers, printers, software and related accessories and general office supplies.
* In general, RFI funding cannot be used to replace current salary funding. Exceptions can be made if the salary savings are needed to backfill positions that allow the PI or other team members to meet current program commitments. Summer salary or positions funded with “soft” dollars are allowed. Exceptions should be explained in the Budget Justification section.
Click here to:
  • Enter title page information using the online form
  • Upload proposal information as a single PDF document

1. Title Page Information

(Entered online and required for submission.)
  • Project Title
  • Total Request Amount ($)
  • Principal Investigator (Name, Affiliation, Telephone & Email)
  • Co-Principal Investigator(s) (Name, Affiliation, Telephone & Email)
  • Other Partners (if applicable)

2. Resesarch & Engagement Proposal: Administrative Approval Form

The person who wigns this form should be the PI or co-PI from the University of Nebraska who will administer the award funds.  Include his/her campus address as well as the PI or co-PI signature. It also requires signature of the appropriate campus administrator, verifying submission approval.

3. Abstract

(1/2 page – abstract on separate page from project narrative) Summarize the purpose, importance, expected outcomes and key activities/milestones of the proposal.

4. Project Narrative

The project narrative is limited to six single-spaced pages, using Times New Roman (or similar), 11-point font and one-inch margins. The project narrative should include the following:
  • Context/Justification: Provide the background/rationale for the project, including why the topic/scope is critical to the future of rural areas, and its linkage to the RFI’s vision and mission. What is the underlying need, problem or opportunity that the proposal addresses? How does the project consider the triple bottom line of economic, social and environmental considerations?
  • Ultimate Long-Term Impact (one sentence): If the objectives of this proposal are successfully completed, what could potentially be different ten years from now in rural areas of Nebraska and beyond?
  • Project Objective(s): What specific objective(s) will be reached at the end of the grant period?
  • Methodology and Time Line: Explain the methodology and associated time line of the methodological steps that will be undertaken to insure that the project objectives are met in a timely and successful fashion. Explicitly address how the tools, results, applications, findings, innovations or processes will be shared with both the academic and non-academic communities, including rural people and places.
  • Partnerships: What new University partnerships will be established through this project with: (a) organizations, institutions and agencies external to NU, and (b) specific communities? What are the roles and responsibilities of each partner? What groundwork has already been laid and what else will be needed to insure that these partnerships function effectively? Will these partnerships be sustained beyond the award’s lifetime?
  • Project Success: What does success look like and how will it be measured?
  • Beyond the Project: If this project proposal is successful, what might be the next logical steps and subsequent opportunities, including other funding opportunities?
  • Identifying and Managing Adversity: Obstacles and barriers are often encountered in the implementation and execution of new projects. What do you anticipate will be the most challenging aspect of executing your proposal and what are some steps that can be taken to minimize this challenge or are there alternative ways of moving the project forward if the obstacle is insurmountable?
Note: References cited in the Context/Justification section are included in the 6-page limit.

5. Budget Table(s) and Budget Justification

Budget detail must be provided in the attached budget table(s) for Year One and, if applicable, Year Two. The budget tables (A2a and A2b) must be accompanied by a budget justification (no more than one page) which explains expenditures in each budget category. Budget lines for Year 1 and Year 2 may be combined in the budget justification narrative.

6. Biographical Materials

Provide up to a two-page biographical sketch/vitae for each PI/co-PIs. Do not exceed two pages per person.

7. Letters of Commitment

If the success of the proposal is linked to agencies, organizations or institutions external to the University of Nebraska, include letters of commitment from the relevant agencies, organizations or institutions. The letters should specify clearly what the role and nature of the commitment is. NOTE: these are NOT letters of support in which external stakeholders indicate their support for the proposal. The latter type of letter is not to be included.
Following is the list of criteria by which the research proposals will be evaluated:
  • Transdisciplinary, collaborative, innovative and bold (20 points)
  • The context/justification (15 points)
  • Short-term considerations/meeting project objectives (20 points)
  • Long-term considerations (10 points)
  • Project administration (20 points)
  • Budget considerations (15 points)
Principal investigators will be required to submit project reports on behalf of their teams to the Rural Futures Institute. Reports will be required every six months and final reports will be required 30 days after the end of the project.

Proposal Deadline:
March 15, 2017, 4:00 PM CST

Award Notification:
May 15, 2017

Start Date:
July 1, 2017

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2017 Teaching & Engagement | Request for Proposals

November 30, 2016
2017 Teaching & Engagement Thank you for your interest in the 2017 Rural Futures Institute Teaching & Engagement Awards Program. As it is after 4:00 pm CST on Wednesday, March 1, we are no longer accepting proposal submissions. Up to five awards …

2017 Teaching & Engagement

Thank you for your interest in the 2017 Rural Futures Institute Teaching & Engagement Awards Program. As it is after 4:00 pm CST on Wednesday, March 1, we are no longer accepting proposal submissions.

  • Up to five awards will be made with $20,000 maximum per award.
  • The project time period will not exceed 24 months.
  • Each program/project/course must be delivered twice during the two years.

If you have questions about the submission process, please contact Kim Peterson kpeterson@nebraska.edu or call 402-472-9287.

The University of Nebraska is committed to establishing a transformative Rural Futures Institute (RFI). RFI's vision, mission and core values are the fundamental underpinnings for this request for proposals.

Vision

RFI will be a locally, nationally and internationally recognized leader focused on increasing community capacity as well as the hope and confidence of rural people to address their challenges and opportunities, resulting in resilient and sustainable futures.

Mission

Through a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship, RFI mobilizes the diverse resources of the University of Nebraska and its partners to support rural communities and regions in building upon their unique strengths and assets to achieve their desired futures.

Core Values

The work commissioned and supported by RFI must be guided by the Institute’s core values:
  • Bold
  • Transdisciplinary
  • Innovative
  • Agile
  • Collaborative
  • Reflective
The purpose of RFI Teaching & Engagement Competitive Awards is to foster the development of civic engagement in both students and community partners. Inherent to the vision, mission, and core values of RFI, the awards program particularly encourages rural community members in partnership with higher education institutions to seek funding that results in college students involvement in providing services to help meet the community’s needs. Faculty and staff seeking funding should ensure that any civic engagement or service learning endeavor integrates meaningful student service experiences into the curriculum and, in the case of service learning, builds curriculum-based reflection activities to enhance student learning. RFI will assist in identifying potential partners, if asked. Project proposals must focus on involving students in one or more of the following areas:

a) Civic Engagement

Implement civic engagement efforts into new or existing programs to develop RFI's core values in both communities and partnering campuses. For example, involving partners in recruitment/retention programs; creating learning communities that include civic engagement in the design; establishing diversity initiatives that explicitly link active and collaborative community-based teaching and learning with the academic success of underrepresented students or internship programs in rural communities. Community partners are particularly encouraged to seek, in conjunction with participating campuses or institutions of higher education, funding for the civic engagement portion of the teaching and learning award funding.

b) Undergraduate & Graduate Service Learning

Applicants must enhance curriculum by designing new course(s) or revising an existing course(s) with a partner agency to include a service learning component. Service learning is a transformational pedagogy that integrates service in the community with academic study. Faculty, in partnership with community representatives, design service learning projects based on two main objectives:
  • meeting identified community needs, which helps strengthen the community;
  • advancing student understanding of course content through real world experiences.
Strong reflective components should be built into the course to help students consider the relationships among their service, the course curriculum, and its impact on their personal values and professional goals. See the following websites for information and examples of service learning:

c) Undergraduate & Graduate Student Community-based Research

Applicants must develop and initiate a community-based research project focused on advancing the field of civic engagement through service learning by addressing a community identified need/issue.
  • University faculty and staff as well as Nebraska community members and non-NU higher education faculty/staff are welcome to apply, however, either the Principal Investigator (PI) or a co-Principal Investigator (co-PI) must be affiliated with NU and take responsibility for administering the award funds.
  • Collaboration with partners external to the University of Nebraska is strongly encouraged.
  • An individual may serve as the PI for only one proposal but may serve as a (co-PI) on one or more proposals.
Proposals will be reviewed by a panel that will include representation from the University of Nebraska’s four campuses who have expertise in service learning, civic engagement, and a clear understanding of RFI's vision, mission and core values. The panel will prioritize applications for funding based upon the selection criteria provided in Section V of this RFP. Final selections will be made by the RFI Executive Director.
  1. Potential to result in contributions to and measurable outcomes consistent with the RFI vision and mission.
  2. Compatibility with the RFI core values, especially reflective and collaborative.
  3. Potential for student learning, addressing rural community needs/issues, advancing the field of civic engagement, and advancing professional development of the applicants.
  4. Potential for establishing and sustaining the program/project/course(s) to continue after the grant period.
  5. Matching funds are not required but may increase the likelihood of funding success.
Those proposals ultimately funded will have certain expectations of the PI and the key personnel including the following:
  • Recipients are expected to participate in a working group composed of RFI Teaching & Engagement award recipients. It is anticipated that group will gather at least once a year to share ‘best practices’ around innovative and creative processes and strategies unique to engaged teaching.
  • Recipients are expected to conduct their program/project/course during both years of the project.
  • Recipients are expected to demonstrate impact by sharing their engaged teaching/research at a number of venues including conferences, such as the Rural Futures Conference, and in refereed publications. In addition, the PI is expected to work with both the RFI Director of Competitive Awards and the RFI Director of Communications on external communications opportunities (white papers, interviews, recorded presentation, lecture, webinar, etc.) to share project results/findings with the broader RFI audience.
  • A final report is required and due to RFI no later than one month following the conclusion of funding.
  • The project should be completed within 24 months and extensions are discouraged and will only be considered for extreme circumstances (6 months maximum).
Funds may be used for wages and salaries of faculty and staff (provided the award is not used to generate salary savings*), graduate and undergraduate students and other key personnel, as well as operating expenses such as databases, supplies and travel that are directly related to the project.

Funds may not be used for any of the following purposes:

  • To replace current funding*;
  • Remodeling, renovation or construction;
  • Recruitment or start-up packages for new hires; and
  • Items for purposes not exclusive to the project, such as desktop or laptop computers, iPads, printers, software and related accessories and general office supplies.
* In general, RFI funding cannot be used to replace current salary funding. Exceptions can be made if the salary savings are needed to backfill positions that allow the PI or other team members to meet current program commitments. Summer salary or positions funded with “soft” dollars are allowed. Exceptions should be explained in the Budget Justification section.
Click here to:
  • Enter title page information using the online form
  • Upload proposal information as a single PDF document

1. Title Page Information

(entered online, required for submission)
  • Title
  • Total Request Amount ($)
  • Principal Investigator (Name, Affiliation, Telephone & Email)
  • Co-Principal Investigator(s) (Name, Affiliation, Telephone & Email)
  • Other Partners (if applicable)

2. Project Description

The project description is limited to three single-spaced pages, using Times New Roman (or similar) 11-point font and one-inch borders in a PDF format. The project description should describe the proposed program/project/course(s) as it relates to one or more of the following three focus areas, clearly addressing the issues listed in the area below that will be the focus of the project. The plan must include a project timeline.

Undergraduate and Graduate Service Learning

  • Include a course description and learning outcomes.
  • Provide a clear rationale for why and how service learning should be integrated into the course(s).
  • Describe the reflection activities that clearly link the service experience with the learning objectives of the course.
  • Provide evidence for the sustainability of the course after the grant period ends.

Undergraduate and Graduate Student Research

  • Describe the community-based project.
  • Describe how the project integrates with teaching and professional service.
  • Describe student roles in the project and the reflective activities structured to link the service experience with the learning.
  • Provide evidence for project sustainability.
  • Describe how the results will be communicated.

Civic Engagement

  • Include a description of the engagement program and expected outcomes (recruitment/retention rates, diversity focused learning objectives, etc.).
  • Provide a clear rationale for why and how the engagement activities are integrated into the program.
  • Provide evidence for the sustainability of the program after the grant period ends.

List the project's long-term and short-term goals related to:

  • Student learning;
  • Furthering institutional and departmental goals toward institutionalization of civic engagement and service learning;
  • Addressing community needs/issues;
  • Advancing the field of civic engagement and service learning as the pedagogy of engagement; and
  • Community partnerships including the role of community representatives in the design and implementation of the program/project/course(s).
Note: References cited in Project Description are included in the three-page limit and should conform to an accepted journal format.

3. Project Budget

Provide a one-page budget in which personnel and operating expenditures are identified and explained.

4. Biographical Materials

Provide up to a two-page biographical sketch/vitae for each PI/co-PIs. Do not exceed two pages per person.

Proposal Deadline:
March 1, 2017, 4:00 PM CST

Award Notification:
May 1, 2017

Start Date:
July 1, 2017

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2016 RFI Competitive Awards

June 1, 2016
TEACHING AND ENGAGEMENT Proposals selected to receive funding include: Facilitating the Implementation of Social Media Plans for Small Businesses & Local Non-Profits through Service Learning at UNK Sherri Harms (PI), University of Nebraska at Kearney (UNK) partnering with the Economic …

TEACHING AND ENGAGEMENT

Proposals selected to receive funding include:

Facilitating the Implementation of Social Media Plans for Small Businesses
& Local Non-Profits through Service Learning at UNK

Sherri Harms (PI), University of Nebraska at Kearney (UNK) partnering with the Economic Development Council of Buffalo County, Nebraska.
Many rural Nebraska small businesses and non-profit organizations do not have the expertise or resources to implement social media plans, which can limit their organizational reach. This project will implement a service learning component to an existing course, where students work with organizations to develop and implement social media plans, in partnership with the Economic Development Council of Buffalo County.

 

Art at Cedar Point

Karen Kunc (PI), University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) partnering with the Ogallala Public School District, Nebraska Game and Parks, Lake McConaughy Visitor/Water Interpretive Center, Nebraska Art Teachers Association and the Petrified Wood Art Museum in Ogallala, Nebraska.
Art at Cedar Point is a transdisciplinary program which blends art and science through undergraduate field courses and artist residencies at Cedar Point Biological Station in western Nebraska. This innovative project will allow students to experience the unique ecosystems and communities of rural western Nebraska and showcase the potential for artists working in rural areas by developing the only Artist in Residence program in the region. 

 

Minority Health Disparities Initiative (MHDI): Youth Are Rural Health Program (YouRhealth)

Kim Matthews (PI), University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) partnering with Lexington High School, Sheldon Art Museum, UNK, UNMC College of Nursing, Lexington Regional Health Center and DHHS.
YouRhealth is a new innovative and bold initiative that creates a learning community that includes civic engagement by transforming Lexington High School’s (LHS) freshman health course into a rigorous visual literacy/critical thinking/community engagement environment. This project will implement the YouRhealth program that teaches freshman high school students to be community health educators by developing and presenting multimedia public health campaigns to their family and friends, as well as provide NU students civic engagement opportunities in a predominately minority community.

 

Understanding Hispanics and Sense of Community in Rural Nebraska

Athena Ramos (PI), University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) partnering with Platte County (Columbus) and Colfax County (Schuyler).
A mixed methods research study will be conducted within two Nebraska counties to better understand the assets and the challenges associated with being Hispanic/Latino in rural Nebraska. This project addresses community concerns that were identified during the 2015 East Central District comprehensive community health needs assessment. Six focus groups (three in each county) and a survey of at least 100 Hispanic/Latino individuals from each community will be conducted. A bilingual community report will be developed with community partners that includes actionable recommendations.

 

CEEM Project: A New Community Engagement Education Model

Kim Wilson (PI), University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) partnering with Nebraska Extension, the Center for Rural Entrepreneurship and various community partners including the Willa Cather Foundation, City of Red Cloud, Chamber of Commerce, and others.
Many semester-long service learning (SL) projects realize immediate impact on community partners and SL students, yet has not translated into long-term community impact. It is felt the short timeframe of the fifteen-week semester coupled with the partner’s limited capacity and infrastructure to act on recommendations diminishes long-term impact. This two-year process will evaluate the ability to strengthen partnerships and develop capacity for the region’s residents by going beyond the semester timeframe and including an expanded team that includes Nebraska Extension and community and professional experts and also extends the project timeframe over multiple years with participation of multiple studios of students.
 

RESEARCH AND ENGAGEMENT

Proposals selected to receive funding include:

Identifying the Interrelationships Between Social Determinants, Self-identity, and Public Health in Minority Rural Communities: Photovoice + Random Spatial Sampling Survey

Kirk Dombrowski (PI), Minority Health Disparities Initiative, Departments of Sociology, Nutrition & Health Sciences, Communications, Psychology and Sheldon Art Museum at UNL, partnering with DHHS and Two Rivers Public Health Department
The HealthVoiceVision transdisciplinary team will combine participatory research with traditional random spatial sampling survey to better understand minority health disparities in rural communities. The research results will translate into interventions, tools and data that communities can use to understand and address minority health disparities.

 

Enhancing Nebraska’s Ecotourism Industry

Richard Edwards (PI), Center for Great Plains Studies, with UNL, UNK, UNO, College of Law, Calamus Outfitters, and international connection with Namibia
Private-lands nature-based tourism can provide many benefits to stressed rural areas. This project will focus on international best practices in Namibia that can help Nebraska’s emerging ecotourism industry grow into world leaders in private-lands ecotourism.

 

Rural Prosperity Research Project

Chuck Hibberd (PI), Nebraska Extension, ALEC, NHRI, and College of Architecture at UNL, partnering with UNO, Center for Rural Entrepreneurship, Heartland Center for Leadership Development, Nebraska Community Foundation, and the Aspen Institute
This collaborative will build the capacity of a cohort of rural communities to effectively create conditions for a more prosperous future by: increasing economic opportunities through business creation; building up community assets that support a high quality of life; and attracting and keeping people to achieve demographic renewal. This project applies a systems approach designed to achieve systemic change.

 

Raising Awareness of Health Professionals Education Among Rural Nebraska Latino Youth

Patrik Johansson (PI), UNMC College of Public Health, with UNK, Nebraska Area Health Education Center (AHEC), and partnering with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Nebraska, Central Community College, Doane College, Grand Island Latino Leadership Group, Grand Island Senior High, St. Francis Hospital, and DHHS
Health professions shortages represent a challenge to the sustainability of rural communities. While there are insufficient rural health professionals in general, Latinos are virtually absent from this workforce. This study will develop strategies to raise awareness of health professions education among rural Nebraska Latino high school and college students, resulting in increased numbers of Latino youth who pursue health professions.

 

SPECIAL PROJECTS

The RFI is also funding the following special project:

Collaborative Capacity Building in Rural Nebraska Schools via Technology

Amanda Witte (PI), and Susan Sheridan (co-PI) University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) partnering with rural schools and educators, and the Nebraska Department of Education.
There are long-standing barriers to services in rural communities including insufficient mental health services, cultural differences, and stigma that make access to treatment options for mental and behavioral issues a challenge for students in rural areas. This project will develop and evaluate highly accessible, effective and sustainable solutions for rural schools and families to increase access to mental health supports, address rural students’ mental and behavioral health challenges, and bolster academic success.
 
 
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2016 Research & Engagement Request for Proposals

December 14, 2015
Rural Futures Institute Competitive Awards Program 2016 Research & Engagement Proposals All proposals must be electronically uploaded as a single PDF document to http://ruralfutures.nebraska.edu/2016REaward Proposal deadline: March 15, 2016, 4:00 PM CST Award notification: June 15, 2016 Starting date: July 1, 2016 Download R&E RFP Submit R&E …

Rural Futures Institute Competitive Awards Program
2016 Research & Engagement Proposals


All proposals must be electronically uploaded as a single PDF document to http://ruralfutures.nebraska.edu/2016REaward

Proposal deadline: March 15, 2016, 4:00 PM CST
Award notification: June 15, 2016
Starting date: July 1, 2016

Download R&E RFP Submit R&E Proposal

Download PDF Version »

Scope: Up to four awards will be made with $100,000 maximum per award. The project time period will not exceed 24 months.

If you have questions about the submission process, please contact Kim Peterson at kpeterson@nebraska.edu or call 402-472-9287.


 I. BACKGROUND 

The University of Nebraska is committed to establishing a transformative Rural Futures Institute (RFI) The RFI vision, mission and core values are the fundamental underpinnings for this request for proposals.

Vision
The RFI will be a locally, nationally and internationally recognized leader focused on increasing community capacity as well as the confidence of rural people to address their challenges and opportunities, resulting in resilient and sustainable rural futures. 

Mission
Through a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship, the Rural Futures Institute mobilizes the diverse resources of the University of Nebraska and its partners to support rural communities and regions in building upon their unique strengths and assets to achieve their desired futures. 

Core Values
The work commissioned and supported by the RFI must be guided by the Institute’s core values: Bold, Transdisciplinary, Innovative, Agile, Collaborative, and Reflective

 II. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The purpose of the RFI Competitive Awards Program is to foster the development of research and engagement work that addresses critical challenges and opportunities facing rural areas. These awards are to function as “seed grants” that are designed to lay the foundation for grant requests to funding sources external to the University of Nebraska or sustainable funding through other mechanisms such as fees and contracts.

Although all of the core values underpin this Competitive Awards Program, successful proposals must explicitly address transdisciplinary and collaborative considerations both internal and external to the University. Transdisciplinary research uses a research strategy that crosses many disciplinary boundaries to create a holistic approach. Additionally, if the RFI is to be successful, it must create an environment in which deep and meaningful collaborative partnerships are the norm: across campuses; across departments and disciplines; and with external stakeholders such as other non-University campuses, communities, state and local government, trade associations, civic groups and the philanthropic community. These collaborative partnerships are the essence of engaged research or “engagement.” Engaged research establishes reciprocal relationships of mutual respect and understanding. The mindset and attitude must be one of doing research “with the community”, rather than doing research “for the community” or “to the community.” Finally, proposals are expected to be innovative and bold in their proposed action, partnerships and outcomes.

It is important to note that the issues facing rural areas include economic considerations but not to the exclusion of other equally important considerations. Basic human services such as health care and education present both challenges and opportunities to rural people and places. Even broader considerations are the natural environment and the civic, cultural, design and artistic aspect of human and community development that cannot easily be counted and measured, nor justified only in terms of economic returns. This competitive awards program encourages proposals in which progress and viability are defined by the triple bottom line of economic, social and environmental considerations.

III. ELIGIBLE APPLICANTS 

  • University faculty and staff as well as Nebraska community members and non-NU higher education faculty/staff are welcome to apply, however, either the Principal Investigator (PI) or a co-Principal Investigator (co-PI) must be affiliated with NU and take responsibility for administering the award funds.
  • Collaboration with partners external to the University of Nebraska is strongly encouraged.
  • An individual may serve as the PI for only one proposal but may serve as a (co-PI) on one or more proposals.

IV. REVIEW PROCESS 

Proposals will be reviewed by a panel that will include both academic and non-academic representation. This panel will prioritize applications for funding based upon the criteria provided in Sections V and IX of this RFP. Final approval of proposals to be funded will be made by the Executive Director of the Rural Futures Institute.

V. SELECTION CRITERIA 

  1. Potential to result in contributions to and measurable outcomes consistent with the RFI vision and mission.
  2. Compatibility with the RFI core values, especially transdisciplinary, collaborative, innovative and bold considerations.
  3. Potential to increase competitiveness for future external funding that is consistent with the vision and mission of the RFI.
  4. Matching funds are not required but may increase the likelihood a proposal will be selected for funding.

VI. EXPECTATIONS 

Those proposals ultimately funded will have certain expectations of the PI and the key personnel including the following:

  • Participation in a working group composed of RFI grant recipients. It is anticipated this group will meet at least once per academic year to share ‘best practices’ and lessons learned around innovative and creative processes and strategies unique to the research and engagement work undertaken.
  • Recipients are expected to demonstrate sharing their insights and findings at a variety of appropriate venues including conferences, such as the Rural Futures Conference, and refereed publications.
  • Recipients are expected to actively pursue external funding sources and submit a proposal for external funding within 24 months following the initial RFI award. Failure to do so may disqualify the applicant from future RFI funding competitions.
  • A final report is required and due to the RFI no later than one month following the conclusion of the project.

VII. FUNDING LIMITATIONS 

Funds may be used for wages and salaries of faculty and staff (provided the award is not used to generate salary savings), graduate and undergraduate students and other key personnel; as well as operating expenses such as databases, supplies and travel that are directly related to the project. Funds may not be used for any of the following purposes:

  • Indirect costs
  • To replace current funding*;
  • Remodeling, renovation or construction;
  • Recruitment or start-up packages for new hires; and
  • Items for purposes not exclusive to the project, such as desktop or laptop computers, printers, software and related accessories and general office supplies.

* In general, RFI funding cannot be used to replace current salary funding. Exceptions can be made if the salary savings are needed to backfill positions that allow the PI or other team members to meet current program commitments. Summer salary or positions funded with “soft” dollars are allowed. Exceptions should be explained in the Budget Justification section.

VIII. PROPOSAL SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS AND APPLICATION FORMAT: 

The entire proposal must be submitted as a single PDF document. Please use single spacing and Times New Roman (or similar) 11-point font with one-inch margins on the title page, abstract and narrative. The proposal, including the required administrative approval form, must be received via email at ruralfutures.nebraska.edu/2016REaward by 4 p.m. (Central time) on Tuesday, March 15, 2016.

Each completed proposal will include the following eight components in order: 

  1. Title Page Information (entered online, required for submission) 
    • Project Title
    • Total RFI Funding Requested ($)
    • Principal Investigator (name, title, affiliation, telephone, email)
    • Co-Principal Investigator(s) (name, title, affiliation, telephone, email)
    • Other Partners (if applicable)
  2. Research and Engagement Proposal: Administrative Approval Form – signed (1 page) (See A-1)
    The person who signs this form should be the PI or co-PI from the University of Nebraska who will administer the award funds. Include his/her campus address as well as the PI or co-PI signature. It also requires signatures of the appropriate campus administrators, verifying submission approval.
  3. Abstract (1/2 page – abstract on separate page from project narrative)
    Summarize the purpose, importance, expected outcomes and key activities/milestones of the proposal.
  4. Project Narrative: (6-page maximum)
    1. The project narrative is limited to six single-spaced pages, using Times New Roman (or similar) 11-point font and one-inch margins
    2. The project narrative should include the following:
      • Context/Justification: Provide the background/rationale for the project, including why the topic/scope is critical to the future of rural areas, and its linkage to the RFI’s vision and mission. What is the underlying need, problem or opportunity that the proposal addresses? How does the project consider the triple bottom line of economic, social and environmental considerations?
      • Ultimate Long-Term Impact (one sentence): If the objectives of this proposal are successfully completed, what could potentially be different ten years from now in rural areas of Nebraska and beyond?
      • Project Objective(s): What specific objective(s) will be reached at the end of the grant period?
      • Methodology and Time Line: Explain the methodology and associated time line of the methodological steps that will be undertaken to insure that the project objectives are met in a timely and successful fashion. Explicitly address how the tools, results, applications, findings, innovations or processes will be shared with both the academic and non-academic communities, including rural people and places.
      • Partnerships: What new University partnerships will be established through this project with: (a) organizations, institutions and agencies external to NU, and (b) specific communities? What are the roles and responsibilities of each partner? What groundwork has already been laid and what else will be needed to insure that these partnerships function effectively? Will these partnerships be sustained beyond the award’s lifetime?
      • Project Success: What does success look like and how will it be measured?
      • Beyond the Project: If this project proposal is successful, what might be the next logical steps and subsequent opportunities, including other funding opportunities?
      • Identifying and Managing Adversity: Obstacles and barriers are often encountered in the implementation and execution of new projects. What do you anticipate will be the most challenging aspect of executing your proposal and what are some steps that can be taken to minimize this challenge or are there alternative ways of moving the project forward if the obstacle is insurmountable?Note: References cited in the Context/Justification section are included in the 6-page limit.
  5. Budget Table(s) (1 or 2 pages) and Budget Justification (1 page)
    Budget detail must be provided in the attached budget table(s) for Year One and, if applicable, Year Two. The budget tables (A2a and A2b) must be accompanied by a budget justification (no more than one page) which explains expenditures in each budget category. Budget lines for Year 1 and Year 2 may be combined in the budget justification narrative.
  6. Biographical Sketch or Vitae of PI and Key Personnel (2 pages per person)
    Not to exceed two pages per person.
  7. Letters of Commitment
    If the success of the proposal is linked to agencies, organizations or institutions external to the University of Nebraska, include letters of commitment from the relevant agencies, organizations or institutions. The letters should specify clearly what the role and nature of the commitment is. NOTE: these are NOT letters of support in which external stakeholders indicate their support for the proposal. The latter type of letter is not to be included.
  8. Waiver of Access to Reviewer’s Assessment – signed (1 page)
    The Principal Investigator (PI) submitting the proposal is required to sign the attached form (see A-3) on behalf of the team, waiving all access to the assessment of reviewers. A proposal without a completed waiver form will be returned. After funding decisions are made, anonymous reviewer comments will be forwarded to the principal investigator.

IX. CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION 

Following is the list of criteria by which the research proposals will be evaluated (see A-4):

  • Transdisciplinary, collaborative, innovative and bold (20 points)
  • The context/justification (15 points)
  • Short-term considerations/meeting project objectives (20 points)
  • Long-term considerations (10 points)
  • Project administration (20 points)
  • Budget considerations (15 points)

X. SUBMISSION DATE 

Proposals, including administrative approval signatures, must be received as a single PDF at ruralfutures.nebraska.edu/2016REaward by 4 p.m. (Central time) on Tuesday, March 15, 2016. Proposals received after this deadline will be returned to the applicant without review.

If you have questions about the submission process, please contact Kim Peterson at kpeterson@nebraska.edu or call 402-472-9287.

XI. POST AWARD MANAGEMENT AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS 

Principal investigators will be required to submit project reports on behalf of their teams to the Rural Futures Institute. Reports will be required every six months and final reports will be required 30 days after the end of the project.

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2016 Teaching & Engagement Request for Proposals

December 14, 2015
Rural Futures Institute Competitive Awards Program 2016 Teaching & Engagement Development Awards Request for Proposals All proposals must be electronically uploaded as a single PDF document to http://ruralfutures.nebraska.edu/2016TEaward Proposal deadline: March 1, 2016, 4:00 PM CST Award notification: June 1, 2016 …

Rural Futures Institute Competitive Awards Program
2016 Teaching & Engagement Development Awards
Request for Proposals


All proposals must be electronically uploaded as a single PDF document to http://ruralfutures.nebraska.edu/2016TEaward

Proposal deadline: March 1, 2016, 4:00 PM CST
Award notification: June 1, 2016
Starting date: July 1, 2016

Download T&E RFP Submit T&E Proposal

Scope: Up to five awards will be made with $20,000 maximum per award. The project time period will not exceed 24 months. Each program/project/course must be delivered twice during the two years.

If you have questions about the submission process, please contact Kim Peterson kpeterson@nebraska.edu or call 402-472-9287.


 I. BACKGROUND 

The University of Nebraska is committed to establishing a transformative Rural Futures Institute (RFI). The RFI vision, mission and core values are the fundamental underpinnings for this request for proposals.

Vision
The RFI will be a locally, nationally and internationally recognized leader focused on increasing community capacity as well as the hope and confidence of rural people to address their challenges and opportunities, resulting in resilient and sustainable futures. 

Mission
Through a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship, the RFI mobilizes the diverse resources of the University of Nebraska and its partners to support rural communities and regions in building upon their unique strengths and assets to achieve their desired futures. 

Core Values
The work commissioned and supported by the RFI must be guided by the Institute’s core values: Bold Transdisciplinary Innovative Agile Collaborative and Reflective

 II. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The purpose of the RFI Teaching & Engagement Competitive Awards Program is to foster the development of civic engagement in both students and community partners. Inherent to the vision, mission, and core values of the RFI, the awards program particularly encourages rural community members in partnership with higher education institutions to seek funding that results in college students involvement in providing services to help meet the community’s needs. Faculty and staff seeking funding should ensure that any civic engagement or service learning endeavor integrates meaningful student service experiences into the curriculum and, in the case of service learning, builds curriculum-based reflection activities to enhance student learning. The RFI will assist in identifying potential partners, if asked.

Project proposals must focus on involving students in one or more of the following areas:

  1. Civic Engagement
    Implement civic engagement efforts into new or existing programs to develop RFI core values in both communities and partnering campuses. For example, involving partners in recruitment/retention programs; creating learning communities that include civic engagement in the design; establishing diversity initiatives that explicitly link active and collaborative community-based teaching and learning with the academic success of underrepresented students or internship programs in rural communities. Community partners are particularly encouraged to seek, in conjunction with participating campuses or institutions of higher education, funding for the civic engagement portion of the teaching and learning award funding.
  2. Undergraduate and Graduate Service Learning
    Applicants must enhance curriculum by designing new course(s) or revising an existing course(s) with a partner agency to include a service learning component. Service learning is a transformational pedagogy that integrates service in the community with academic study. Faculty, in partnership with community representatives, design service learning projects based on two main objectives:

  3. Undergraduate and Graduate Student Community-based Research
    Applicants must develop and initiate a community-based research project focused on advancing the field of civic engagement through service learning by addressing a community identified need/issue.

III. ELIGIBLE APPLICANTS 

  • University faculty and staff as well as Nebraska community members and non-NU higher education faculty/staff are welcome to apply, however, either the Principal Investigator (PI) or a co-Principal Investigator (co-PI) must be affiliated with NU and take responsibility for administering the grant funds.
  • Collaboration with partners external to the University of Nebraska is strongly encouraged.
  • An individual may serve as the PI for only one proposal but may serve as a (co-PI) on one or more proposals.

IV. REVIEW PROCESS 

Proposals will be reviewed by a panel that will include representation from the University of Nebraska’s four campuses who have expertise in service learning, civic engagement, and a clear understanding of the vision, mission and core values of the RFI. The panel will prioritize applications for funding based upon the selection criteria provided in Section V of this RFP. Final selections will be made by the RFI Executive Director.

V. SELECTION CRITERIA 

  1. Potential to result in contributions to and measurable outcomes consistent with the RFI vision and mission.
  2. Compatibility with the RFI core values, especially reflective and collaborative.
  3. Potential for student learning, addressing rural community needs/issues, advancing the field of civic engagement, and advancing professional development of the applicants.
  4. Potential for establishing and sustaining the program/project/course(s) to continue after the grant period.
  5. Matching funds are not required but may increase the likelihood of funding success. 

VI. EXPECTATIONS 

Those proposals ultimately funded will have certain expectations of the PI and the key personnel including the following:

  • Recipients are expected to participate in a working group composed of the RFI Teaching & Engagement award recipients. It is anticipated that group will gather at least once a year to share ‘best practices’ around innovative and creative processes and strategies unique to engaged teaching.
  • Recipients are expected to conduct their program/project/course during both years of the project.
  • Recipients are expected to demonstrate impact by sharing their research at a number of venues including conferences, such as the Rural Futures Conference, and in refereed publications.
  • A final report is required and due to the RFI no later than one month following the conclusion of funding.

VII. FUNDING LIMITATIONS 

Funds may be used for wages and salaries of faculty and staff (provided the award is not used to generate salary savings), graduate and undergraduate students and other key personnel, as well as operating expenses such as databases, supplies and travel that are directly related to the project. Funds may not be used for any of the following purposes:

  • To replace current funding;
  • Remodeling, renovation or construction;
  • Recruitment or start-up packages for new hires; and
  • Items for purposes not exclusive to the project, such as desktop or laptop computers, iPads, printers, software and related accessories and general office supplies.

VIII. PROPOSAL SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS AND APPLICATION FORMAT: 

Go to http://ruralfutures.nebraska.edu/2016TEaward to:

  • Enter title page information using the online form
  • Upload proposal information as a single PDF document

Title Page Information: (entered online, required for submission) 

  1. Title
  2. Total Request Amount ($)
  3. Principal Investigator
    • Name
    • Affiliation
    • Telephone
    • Email
  4. Co-Principal Investigator(s)
    • Name
    • Affiliation
    • Telephone
    • Email
  5. Other Partners (if applicable)

Proposal Information: (upload as a single PDF document)

  1. Project Description: (three pages)
    • The project description is limited to three single-spaced pages, using Times New Roman (or similar) 11-point font and one-inch borders in a PDF format.
    • The project description should describe the proposed program/project/course(s) as it relates to one or more of the following three focus areas, clearly addressing the issues listed in the area below that will be the focus of the project. The plan must include a project timeline.
      1. Undergraduate and Graduate Service Learning 
        • Include a course description and learning outcomes.
        • Provide a clear rationale for why and how service learning should be integrated into the course(s).
        • Describe the reflection activities that clearly link the service experience with the learning objectives of the course.
        • Provide evidence for the sustainability of the course after the grant period ends.
      2. Undergraduate and Graduate Student Research 
        • Describe the community-based project.
        • Describe how the project integrates with teaching and professional service.
        • Describe student roles in the project and the reflective activities structured to link the service experience with the learning.
        • Provide evidence for project sustainability.
        • Describe how the results will be communicated.
      3. Civic Engagement 
        • Include a description of the engagement program and expected outcomes (recruitment/retention rates, diversity focused learning objectives, etc.).
        • Provide a clear rationale for why and how the engagement activities are integrated into the program.
        • Provide evidence for the sustainability of the program after the grant period ends.
    • List the project’s long-term and short-term goals related to:
      • Student learning;
      • Furthering institutional and departmental goals toward institutionalization of civic engagement and service learning;
      • Addressing community needs/issues;
      • Advancing the field of civic engagement and service learning as the pedagogy of engagement; and
      • Community partnerships including the role of community representatives in the design and implementation of the program/project/course(s).Note: References cited in Project Description are included in the three-page limit and should conform to an accepted journal format.
  2. Project Budget: (one page)
    Provide a one-page budget in which personnel and operating expenditures are identified and explained.
  3. Biographical Materials: (two pages per person)
    Provide up to a two-page biographical sketch/vitae for each key personnel.

If you have questions about the submission process, please contact Kim Peterson kpeterson@nebraska.edu or call 402-472-9287.

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2014 Research & Engagement Grants

October 7, 2013
Thank you for your interest in the 2014 Rural Futures Institute Competitive Grants program. We are not accepting proposals at the present time, please check back at a later date to submit your proposal.

Thank you for your interest in the 2014 Rural Futures Institute Competitive Grants program. We are not accepting proposals at the present time, please check back at a later date to submit your proposal.

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2014 Teaching & Engagement Grants

October 7, 2013
Thank you for your interest in the 2014 Rural Futures Institute Competitive Grants program. We are not accepting proposals at the present time, please check back at a later date to submit your proposal.

Thank you for your interest in the 2014 Rural Futures Institute Competitive Grants program. We are not accepting proposals at the present time, please check back at a later date to submit your proposal.

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Teaching & Engagement Grants Awarded

January 7, 2013
Six grants to receive funding With an outstanding response to the Teaching and Engagement Development Grants Request for Proposals, each of the 33 submitted applications were evaluated by three reviewers. Those receiving the highest evaluations were forwarded to a final review team who, in …

Six grants to receive funding

With an outstanding response to the Teaching and Engagement Development Grants Request for Proposals, each of the 33 submitted applications were evaluated by three reviewers. Those receiving the highest evaluations were forwarded to a final review team who, in consultation with NU Vice President Ronnie Green, selected the following proposals to receive funding.

 

1. Ecotourism and Agritourism Development in Nebraska

      • Lisa Pennisi, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Human Dimensions, School of Natural Resources
      • Nicole Wall, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, National Drought Mitigation Center
      • Michelle Kang, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Tourism Marketing
      • Tom Field, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Director Engler Agribusiness Entrepreneurship Program
      • Twyla Witt, Nebraska Tourism Commission, Tourism Development & Byways Consultant
      • Caleb Pollard, Valley County Economic Development & Ord Area Chamber of Commerce
      • Rick Edwards, Center for Great Plains Studies
      • Janell Anderson Ehrke, GROW Nebraska

This project aims to develop a course, to be taught in May, that will incorporate ecotourism, tourism marketing, entrepreneurship, business plans, visitor services and the Community Capitals Framework for community engagement. The long-term goal is to assist rural landowners and communities in increasing economic and community capacity by developing successful ecotourism ventures that enhance environmental sustainability while also educating and developing undergraduate students.

 

2. Engaging Nebraska, Impacting Communities, Transforming Students

      • Jeff Day, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, College of Architecture
      • Lindsey Bahe, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, College of Architecture
      • Bret Betnar, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, College of Architecture
      • Tim Hemsath, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, College of Architecture
      • Peter Hind, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, College of Architecture
      • Sharon Kuska, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, College of Architecture
      • David Karle, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, College of Architecture
      • Sarah Thomas Karle, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, College of Architecture
      • Yunwoo Nam, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, College of Architecture
      • Zhenghong Tang, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, College of Architecture

This project aims to establish the infrastructure for a robust service-learning program embedded in curricula. Engaging ten faculty from architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, and planning programs, the team proposes establishing a learning community that is faculty led and service-learning based. This learning community will spend the next two years transforming twelve existing courses, as well as developing new courses and programs, that engage students in service-learning projects across the state.

 

3. Juvenile Re-entry to Nebraska’s Rural Communities

      • Anne Hobbs, University of Nebraska Omaha, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice
      • Julie Campbell, University of Nebraska at Kearney, Department of Criminology
      • Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Youth Rehabilitation Centers

This project aims to extend traditional Nebraska Health and Human Service policy through broadening the academic paradigm and activating community engagement by matching college student mentors from rural communities who are attending the University of Nebraska with youth committed to the Youth Rehabilitation Centers in Geneva and Kearney, Nebraska.

 

4. Rural Community Serviceship Program 

      • Tom Field, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Engler Agribusiness Entrepreneurship Program
      • Reshell Ray, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Student Involvement
      • Linda Major, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Center for Civic Engagement
      • Linda Moody, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Center for Civic Engagement
      • Lindsay Hastings, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Nebraska Human Resources Institute
      • Milan Wall, Heartland Center for Leadership Development
      • Kurt Mantonya, Heartland Center for Leadership Development

This project aims to create a partnership to help students learn and intern with communities in a hybrid approach to service learning. The major elements will include the development of a summer course, followed by a summer serviceship, a reflection period, and then research. This program delivers an interdisciplinary partnership delivery system that focuses on issues identified by the community coupled with the infusion of innovative, entrepreneurial student teams tasked with building workable solutions in concert with university faculty and specialists alongside community leaders and mentors. The combination of discipline, community engagement, and leadership training/experience creates human capacity and opens the door for active recruitment of new graduates and young professionals into the fabric of a rural community.

 

5. The Rural Public Health Undergraduate Student Research Project

      • Patrik Johansson, University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Public Health, Rural Health Education Network
      • Sonja Russell, University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Public Health, Rural Health Education Network
      • Jill Mack, Chadron State College, Physical and Life Sciences
      • Kyle Ryan, Peru State, School of Education
      • Peggy Abels, University of Nebraska at Kearney, Health Sciences
      • David Peitz, Wayne State College, Chemistry

This project will address Nebraska’s rural public health professions workforce shortages by integrating teaching and professional service, in addition to reflective activities structured to link the service experience with the learning of the student. Community-based research projects will address identified rural public health priorities and needs in partnership with a community-based organization. In addition, the representation of undergraduate students will provide a forum for expression of rural youth voices, while finding solutions to existing public health issues in rural Nebraska. Having students conduct public health research with their communities will also further existing institutional goals toward institutionalization of community engagement and service learning.

 

6. Students Engaged in Economic Development of Rural Areas

      • Kaye Sorensen, University of Nebraska at Kearney, Department of Mathematics
      • Marc Albrecht, University of Nebraska at Kearney, Department of Biology

University of Nebraska at Kearney undergraduates will create and assemble rural development ideas that are collected by students and rural stakeholders.  Students will identify promising economic development opportunities and will present these novel and creative ideas to the communities with ideas for implementation.

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