RFI Fellows Panel Discusses Rural Health Care in Livestream

Four fellows from the Rural Futures Institute (RFI) at the University of Nebraska joined the Rural Impact Hub for a panel titled, “Healthy Rural America: A panel with rural health care experts,” on Thurs., May 10, in Auburn, Neb.

The fellows, who highlighted areas of growth and opportunity within the healthcare industry, included:

Kyle Ryan, Ph.D.

Professor of Kinesiology
Peru State College

 

 


Gregory M. Karst, Ph.D., P.T.

Executive Associate Dean
College of Allied Health Professions | UNMC

 


Athena Ramos, Ph.D.

Community Health Program Manager
College of Public Health | UNMC

 

 


Marty Fattig

Chief Executive Officer
Nemaha County Hospital

 

With a wide array of backgrounds all connected by rural health care, the panelists discussed the largest opportunities for growth in rural community healthcare and ways communities can benefit from enhanced access to healthcare and community health resources. They then took questions from participants centered around rural health.

Learn more about RFI Fellows »

May 21, 2018

Today, through RFI Student Serviceship, 11 Nebraska communities are welcoming 24 students from the University of Nebraska at Kearney, University of Nebraska–Lincoln and University of Nebraska at Omaha as well as Peru State College to live, work and serve for 10 weeks this summer.

The students participating in this year’s experience come from hometowns large and small — from Crofton, Neb., town of approximately 800, to Chennai, India, population 7 million. Students’ areas of study include agribusiness, disease and human health, exercise science, hospitality, political science, public administration and more. They also range from freshmen to graduate students, and each student pair was created to intentionally connect complementary skill sets and varying backgrounds and experiences.

In terms of communities and projects, students will problem-solve and create opportunities within the areas of housing, community recruitment, community planning, welcoming, economic development and more. They will participate and lead projects that will include strategic planning, event planning, assessment creation and analysis, visioning and marketing.

Release »

Overview Page »

May 24, 2018

Rural community leaders from across Nebraska are working with University faculty, students and Nebraska Extension educators to define rural prosperity and create strategies for rural communities across the country to reach their goals. Funded by the Rural Futures Institute in 2016, the project is creating action through the work of dedicated community members, committed NU faculty and energized NU students.

This is just one of many examples of projects RFI is proud to have supported that resulted in true collaboration across Nebraska, and provides insights for rural communities across the country. We look forward to sharing the best practices that come forward out of this work.

More information about this project »

All 50 RFI-funded research and teaching projects »

May 25, 2018

Starting this week, 11 communities throughout Nebraska welcomed 24 students from University of Nebraska at Kearney, University of Nebraska at Omaha, University of Nebraska–Lincoln and Peru State College to work on strategic, future-focused projects, serve and live through the RFI Student Serviceship program.

Throughout the summer, the serviceship teams will share reflections and updates on their projects biweekly through RFI’s “This Week In Serviceship!” coverage. This week’s updates come from serviceship teams in Alliance, McCook, Neligh, and Seward, Neb., as well as the THETA camp team in McCook, Neb.!

Release »

This Week In Serviceship 2018: Week One!

RFI Serviceship Group Photo. May 18, 2018. Photo by Craig Chandler / University Communication

Starting May 21, 2018, 11 communities throughout Nebraska welcomed 24 students from University of Nebraska at Kearney, University of Nebraska at Omaha, University of Nebraska–Lincoln and Peru State College to work on strategic, future-focused projects, serve and live. Throughout the summer, the serviceship teams will share reflections and updates on their projects biweekly through RFI’s “This Week In Serviceship!” coverage.

 

2018 Serviceship!

 

Alliance, Neb.

The concept of our project is to create a Marketing Hometown America video to attract new residents to Box Butte County. We are also creating social media hashtags and providing input on websites that are involved with Box Butte County. We have yet to determine how long the video will be, but as of right now we have brainstormed multiple hashtags for Alliance and have gotten a good idea of who we want to interview in Alliance and Hemingford for the video. We have also looked through the websites and provided suggestions to improve them.

We have had a very busy first week. On Monday, we toured Alliance to get an idea of where everything was and met the people who work in our office. On Tuesday, we toured Hemingford, met many business owners and had a meeting. On Wednesday, we worked on hashtags and video ideas, had a meeting at the Knights Museum and Sandhills Center in Alliance and then had an afternoon meeting in our office. We took pictures of the meetings.

Executive Director of the Alliance Chamber Susan Unzicker said, “Mirissa and Haley have given us in the office a new view of the community through our websites and other outside activities.”

Haley and Mirissa pose with Joni Jespersen of Hemingford, Neb., who is part of their host team during their Serviceship in Alliance.

On Thursday, we had a meeting at First National Bank with the branch president and the president of First National Bank from Omaha, Clark Lauritzen. Then, we went to Chadron and had a meeting with the Western Nebraska Development Network. We also discussed the Alliance and Hemingford websites with our lead mentor Chelsie Herian. On Friday, we sat in on a talk with the Alliance Times-Herald and also visited with a storyteller about our project.

Some cool people we have met while we have been here are: Joni Jespersen, Brenda McDonald, Chas Lierk, Ellen Lierk, Chelsie Herian, Susan Unzicker, Nita Peterson, and Jenny Nixon. Joni is with the village of Hemingford and has attended meetings with us. Brenda works with the Panhandle Prevention Coalition. Chas and Ellen are our host family for the first two weeks we are in Alliance. Chelsie is our lead mentor. Susan and Nita both work in our office and Jenny is with Nebraska Extension. They are all very helpful and will be wonderful to work with while doing this project.

A key takeaway we have realized is that we balance each other out really well. Haley is more go with the flow and Mirissa is high strung but we both think a lot alike when it comes to ideas and contributions to the project. We think we are going to be successful!

This experience has made me realize how important leadership is in rural communities, and I hope that Haley and I can represent Box Butte County in the best way possible so people see what a great place it is to live and work.
Mirissa Scholting
Serviceship Intern, Alliance, Neb.

McCook, Neb.

Day one of week one was spent meeting community members and getting a tour of downtown McCook from our project supervisors Carol Schlegel and Ben Dutton. Walking the brick streets that pave the way for the many successful local shops was definitely a highlight to our first day! We will primarily report to Carol, McCook’s Tourism Director, since our primary project is creating an action plan for organizing and remodeling the High Plains Museum. After touring the museum, we both agreed that we have more work to do than we expected. However, we are tackling the challenge ahead with fixed determination and high energy.

Through the Rural Futures Institute Serviceship, I have realized that the ideas and work Emily and I bring to the table have actual value in helping make real, positive change in a rural community. The collaboration between community and service is what makes this project so fun and diverse.

SAGE WILLIAMS
SERVICESHIP INTERN, MCCOOK, NEB.

There will have differing opinions to work with as we move forward, which means what we learned during our serviceship training about leadership, personality types and strengths will definitely be useful. We look forward to working In collaboration with the museum board to decide on the direction the museum wants to go and who the target audience is in order to move forward.

Emily and Sage visited Carhenge at the Knights Museum in Alliance, Neb., while looking for ideas to improve the High Plains Museum in McCook.

To get a few ideas moving forward, we traveled to the Legacy of the Plains Museum in Gering, as well as the Knights Museum in Alliance where we also stopped at the famous Carhenge! These were two very high quality museums, and we were able to pull several new and innovative ideas to potentially apply to the High Plains museum. We invested in flip charts to gather our thoughts after our day of asking questions and note taking at other museums. Since then, we have been photographing items in the museum and, as Carol requested, putting together an inventory of the museum’s assets.

After walking through other museums and brainstorming ideas for the High Plains Museum, we have realized how much potential there really is for the local space. The High Plains Museum could become an important landmark to McCook–one that people will travel from miles around to see and can’t leave town without visiting. Beyond creating a main attraction for tourists, our goal is to make the museum a place that locals keep coming back to through seasonal displays and events. The supportive community of McCook has us excited and hopeful as we proceed with these thoughts in mind!

The Rural Futures Institute Serviceship has taught me that Nebraskans have a shared pride for the rural communities they get to call home.
Emily Frenzen
Serviceship Intern, McCook, Neb.

McCook THETA Camps

We have had an amazing first few days here in McCook. As a trio, THETA is continuing to build upon the foundation laid last summer. We have instantly been thrown into action here in the small community of McCook where we have been making several connections as well as increasing the numbers for our camp attendance this summer.

I’ve felt very welcomed by the community of McCook and in the first week I’ve already seen a large variety of special things that makes McCook stand out from the pack.

BRAD SCHOCH
SERVICESHIP INTERN, MCCOOK THETA CAMPS

 

Our first full day in town, Monday, we started off by stopping by the hospital to visit with Sarah Wolford and let her know that we made it and are ready to get to work. We also visited the local YMCA, the new facility for the THETA camp, to continue to build relationships and look over the utilities and room we will have access to this year. We believe that the YMCA will be a great location for us to have another successful camp this year as we have plenty of space and resources at our fingertips.

The THETA trio talked with Rich Barnett of High Plains Radio about RFI and their camps live on the air.

Continuing on to Tuesday, we were notified in the morning that we were to be at the local radio station, High Plains Radio, in 45 minutes to promote the Rural Futures Institute and our THETA camp live on the air. We had a great time at the radio station where we were able to visit with a few locals as well as the radio host, Rich Barnett. We also connected face-to-face with Rhonda Graft who will give us additional volunteer opportunities that we will be participating in this summer. Bike Across Nebraska will be stopping in McCook in early June, giving us a chance to help out the community since an influx of people will be stopping in McCook. This opportunity is great for us and the businesses in McCook.

We proceeded to stay busy on Wednesday as we visited the hospital again for orientation and to continue meeting more of the locals of McCook. It was a great experience to see this hospital and how the staff all works together in order to accomplish a shared goal–quality patient care. Tyan and Collin visited the physical therapist they shadowed last year and will be shadowing again this year, and Brad connected through a phone call with the clinic whose doctors he will shadow.

It has been great to see all the old faces and reconnect with past connections. I’m looking forward to another great summer.
Tyan Boyer
Serviceship Intern, McCook THETA Camps

Neligh, Neb.

We are conducting a market analyses, or regional mapping report, on both Neligh, Neb., and the greater Northeast Nebraska region. The mapping report will highlight demographics, SWOT assessments, current and future economic trends, infrastructure reports, geography, and identify technologies for integration into Neligh’s “Responsive City” movement. This report will be used to shape the projects within Neligh’s strategic planning process.

Rhiannon and Michayla sat in on the Nebraska Main Street conference in Beatrice, Neb.

On Monday we went on a walking tour of the downtown business district where we met countless active members of boards and business owners. That evening we sat in on a meeting with Nebraska Community Foundation and the Neligh Community Foundation. The next project for Neligh is renovating the old movie theater in town to get it functional again.

Michayla volunteering at the Thriftway Market Burger Bash.

On Wednesday, we had the cool opportunity to travel to Beatrice for a Nebraska Main Street conference. There we heard from economic developers, both private and public, about projects that are going on around the state and learned of funding opportunities for projects. While we were there a discussion occurred where the question was posed, “How do we get young people to come back to rural Nebraska?” It was interesting to see how different generations viewed that challenge differently and had vastly different solutions that could work. On Thursday we worked in the office as well as attended a City Council informational meeting about the nursing home in Neligh. There recently has been some controversy around management so the city is considering leasing the building. On Friday we served burgers at the Thriftway Market Burger Bash.

This week, we both had some key takeaways. Rhiannon learned how nice people are in small towns, that assumptions are detrimental to development and that leadership and knowledge go beyond positions. Michayla learned that misconceptions exist across all divides, that good ideas can come from anyone regardless of title and how often and easy it is to “cut and paste” solutions in economic development.

 

Seward, Neb.

We are working with the Seward County Chamber & Development Partnership (SCCDP) under the mentorship of Jonathan Jank. Our primary project is to develop a sustainable Seward County Newcomers program that will engage new permanent residents and many visitors to Seward County each year. We are also teaming up with local businesses to determine how to attract new customers and to take a fresh look at Seward County to determine what first impressions newcomers have of local communities.

We have specifically started to narrow down our goals for the summer. We will be trying to reach out to newcomers and get more information on how we can make Seward County “sticky.” Some of the questions we will ask members of the community include: “What attracted you to move to Seward?” and “How was your experience moving into Seward? What went great? What could have been better?” We will also try to reach out to leaders of surrounding communities such as Milford, Utica, Bee and Cordova. We also know that the lack of housing has been a problem in Seward County. We are trying to find out the necessary information that can help retain newcomers to staying in Seward County in the long term. Conducting surveys or simply setting up meetings with new families and people to the community may solve this.

 

Maddie poses outside of the Nebraska National Guard Museum in Seward.

This week, we met with the local Kiwanis Club, who are a generous child advocacy group consisting of about 50 members. We were invited to join them for lunch on Monday and were introduced to the club’s president Jerry Meyer. Jerry, who is also curator of the Nebraska National Guard Museum, was generous enough to give us a personal tour of the museum and talked with us for an hour about the community. We then participated in the Seward County Chamber & Development Program board meeting, sharing insight into the SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and timely) goals that Seward County will need to be setting for community and economic development.

On Tuesday, we prepared a press release, and then we sat down for a long goal setting conversation with our mentor Jonathan. We also met with Sarah Skinner, who works for Senator Deb Fischer, and she informed us of the work Senator Fischer is doing in rural America. We then made phone calls to influential community members to set up a time to meet with–this meeting would entail information gathering, for us to get better clarity as to what Seward County needs to stay “sticky.”

 

On Wednesday, we met with Mallory Gibreal. She is the Director of Community Relations at Memorial Health Care Systems. She recently moved to Seward with her husband this past February. We met with her to get more information about what attracted her to Seward, what was good about her moving experience and what could have been better. She gave us very useful information to help us start to find more newcomers and how to retain newcomers in Seward County.

Catch Up With Chuck Episode 27 Rural Opportunities for the Creative Class with Jeanne Wiemer

 

May 25, 2018

Joining us for this week’s episode of Catch Up With Chuck is Jeanne Wiemer, owner of Red Path Gallery & Tasting Room in Seward, Neb., to discuss attracting artists and creatives to rural communities through leadership, passion and entrepreneurship.

Red Path Gallery & Tasting Room, located in a renovated historic building on the Historic Downtown Square of Seward, exhibits creative work of Nebraska artists. Red Path’s intention is to cultivate creativity, keep the arts alive and enhance the culture of their rural community.

“Passion will get you where you need to go, but hard work in Nebraska is what we do too.”

-Jeanne Wiemer

 

A few weeks ago, Chuck was joined by University of Nebraska–Lincoln College of Architecture lecturer Stacy Spale and one of her students to discuss their studio projects which were focused on using design to attract the creative class in the rural areas of Nebraska and beyond. Red Path Gallery & Tasting Room is a great example of how to make this happen, as Wiemer is a community leader taking strides to attract and retain the creative class in Seward.

Seward is also one of the 11 rural communities hosting RFI Serviceship students this summer. The interns in Seward County will be developing a welcoming and engagement program for new permanent residents and temporary visitors.

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Catch Up With Chuck is Facebook Live series with Rural Futures Institute Founding Executive Director Chuck Schroeder. Airing most Thursdays at 11:15 a.m. (CST) on RFI’s Facebook Page, Chuck uses this time to discuss critical rural topics and the latest about RFI while answering viewers’ questions. Stay in touch with Catch Up With Chuck and the Rural Futures Institute through Facebook and Twitter. We will be back soon with another episode looking at rural people and places, success stories, innovators, thinkers and doers who are making rural communities a legitimate best choice for worthwhile living.

 

RELEASE: Nebraska Communities Welcome NU Students For Strategic Projects, Service Learning

Rural Futures Institute Student Serviceship interns group photo

May 21, 2018 — Today 11 Nebraska communities are welcoming 24 students from the University of Nebraska at Kearney, University of Nebraska–Lincoln and University of Nebraska at Omaha as well as Peru State College to live, work and serve for 10 weeks this summer.

Communities include: Alliance, Neb., Broken Bow, Neb., Columbus, Neb., Cozad, Neb., McCook, Neb., Neligh, Neb., Norfolk, Neb., Red Cloud, Neb., and Seward, Neb., as well as communities of practice through Black Hills Energy and Omaha Land Bank Authority.

Organized through the Rural Futures Institute (RFI) at the University of Nebraska, RFI Student Serviceship connects current and future leaders and mentors in acts of service and strategic, future-focused projects that work toward a thriving rural future.

“We are proud to match the talents, perspectives and expertise of high-achieving students with the experience, dedication and knowledge of community leaders through this program,” said RFI Executive Director Chuck Schroeder. “Bringing students together with communities, and for several projects with researchers as well, is where we believe innovation can truly happen.

This program is possible thanks to the time and energy invested by the community host team members—thank you to all of our colleagues throughout the state for making this a rich and rewarding experience.”

The students participating in this year’s experience come from hometowns large and small — from Crofton, Neb., town of approximately 800, to Chennai, India, population 7 million. Students’ areas of study include agribusiness, disease and human health, exercise science, hospitality, political science, public administration and more. They also range from freshmen to graduate students, and each student pair was created to intentionally connect complementary skill sets and varying backgrounds and experiences.

In terms of communities and projects, students will problem-solve and create opportunities within the areas of housing, community recruitment, community planning, welcoming, economic development and more. They will participate and lead projects that will include strategic planning, event planning, assessment creation and analysis, visioning and marketing.

This year marks an important milestone in the growth of the program by more than doubling the total number of student and community participants. The reach beyond rural localities to communities of practice through partnership with the Omaha Land Bank Authority and Black Hills Energy is also new this year. Both of these partners aim to serve the entire state of Nebraska through their work this summer.

“I have interned in Washington, D.C., the past two summers, and I wanted to be in the field working with the people I am supporting in D.C.,” said Rhiannon Cobb, Omaha, Neb., native and sophomore political science and global studies major at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. “RFI provides such an amazing opportunity to not only work in making Nebraska a better state, but allows the development of rural Nebraska.

“Rural communities are the backbone of the U.S., specifically when looking at the economy. It is important to not only work towards supporting the economic development of rural communities but to work with them to gain the knowledge and equipment we need to have the most economic success and productivity possible.”

Community project details and student bios are available at ruralfutures.nebraska.edu/2018serviceship.

Host Communities, Lead Mentors & Students

Alliance, Neb.
Lead Mentor: Chelsie Herian, Executive Director, Box Butte Development Corporation

Haley Ehrke
University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Agribusiness
Hometown: Orleans, Neb.

Mirissa Scholting
University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Agricultural Education
Hometown: Louisville, Neb.

Black Hills Energy
Lead Mentor: Melissa Garcia, Program Manager, Black Hills Energy; RFI Community Innovation Fellow

Emily Coffey
University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Political Science
Hometown: Lincoln, Neb.

Broken Bow
Lead Mentor: Andrew Ambriz, Executive Director, Custer County’s Economic Development Corporation

Leanne Gamet
University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Agricultural & Environmental Sciences Communication
Hometown: Paxton, Neb.

Jessica Weeder
University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Agribusiness
Hometown: Albion, Neb.

Columbus
Lead Mentor: K.C. Belitz, President, Columbus Area Chamber of Commerce

Clayton Keller
University of Nebraska at Omaha, Public Administration
Hometown: Millersport, Ohio

Amber Ross
University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Agribusiness
Hometown: Callaway, Neb.

Cozad
Lead Mentor: Jennifer McKeone, Executive Director, Cozad Development Corporation

Christy Cooper
University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Agricultural Education
Hometown: Waverly, Neb.

Shelby Utech
University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Agricultural Economics
Hometown: Hubbard, Neb.

McCook (2 project teams)
Lead Mentor: Nate Bickford, Associate Professor of Biology, University of Nebraska at Kearney

Tyan Boyer
University of Nebraska at Kearney, Exercise Science
Hometown: Plainview, Neb.

Collin Fleecs
University of Nebraska at Kearney, Exercise Science
Hometown: Sutherland, Neb.

Bradley Schoch
University of Nebraska at Kearney, Exercise Science
Hometown: Marquette, Neb.

Lead Mentor: Carol Schlegel, Director, McCook / Red Willow County Tourism

Emily Frenzen
University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Agricultural & Environmental Sciences Communication
Hometown: Fullerton, Neb.

Sage Williams
University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Agricultural Education
Hometown: Eddyville, Neb.

Neligh
Lead Mentor: Gabriel Steinmeyer, Director of Economic Development, City of Neligh

Michayla Goedeken
University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Integrated Sciences
Hometown: Humphrey, Neb.

Rhiannon Cobb
University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Political Science & Global Studies
Hometown: Omaha, Neb.

Norfolk
Lead Mentor: Tammy Day, co-owner, Daycos, Inc.

Cheyenne Gerlach
University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Integrated Sciences
Hometown: DeWitt, Neb.

Samantha Guenther
University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Agricultural Education
Hometown: Crofton, Neb.

Omaha Land Bank Authority
Lead Mentor: Marty Barnhart, Executive Director, Omaha Municipal Land Bank

Sydney Armbruster
Peru State College, Disease & Human Health
Hometown: Falls City, Neb.

Kyle McGlade
University of Nebraska at Omaha, Public Administration
Hometown: Council Bluffs, Iowa

Red Cloud, Neb.
Lead Mentor: Jarrod McCartney, Heritage Tourism Development Director

Trenton Buhr
University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Political Science, Psychology & Classics
Hometown: Cortland, Neb.

Trevor Harlow
University of Nebraska at Omaha, Political Science & Environmental Studies
Hometown: Waterloo, Neb.

Seward
Lead Mentor: Jonathan Jank, President & CEO, Seward County Chamber & Development Partnership

Raghav Kidambi
University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Human Resource Management
Hometown: Chennai, India

Maddie Miller
University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Hospitality, Restaurant & Tourism Management
Hometown: Waverly, Neb.

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About the Rural Futures Institute
The Rural Futures Institute (RFI) at the University of Nebraska leverages the talents and research-based expertise from across the NU system on behalf of rural communities in Nebraska, the U.S. and around the world. Through a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship, RFI encourages bold and futuristic approaches to address rural issues and opportunities. It works collaboratively with education, business, community, non-profit, government and foundation partners to empower rural communities and their leaders.
ruralfutures.nebraska.edu

Catch Up With Chuck Episode 26 RFI Serviceship Builds Communities and Future Leaders with UNL, UNK Students

 

May 18, 2018

Chuck sat down with Tyan Boyer and Raghav Kidambi, two 2018 RFI Student Serviceship interns who will be living, working and serving in rural Nebraska communities this summer.

Tyan, from Plainview, Neb., is studying exercise science at the University of Nebraska at Kearney. He will be part of the first serviceship team to return to a community for a second year to further their project as his serviceship team continues youth day camps focused on health and wellness in McCook, Neb.

“If we start to formulate these families and start to shape them with this futuristic mindset of how important health is … we can really start to change family by family, community by community and eventually grow this across the state.”

-Tyan Boyer

 

Raghav, a human resource management student at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, will spend 10 weeks in Seward, Neb., where he will be developing a welcoming and engagement program for new permanent residents and temporary visitors. Coming from Chennai, India, an urban city with a population of 4.647 million, he chose to pursue RFI’s Student Serviceship experience in rural Nebraska to experience a new culture and expand his worldview.

“I want to be that catalyst that can make things happen.”

-Raghav Kidambi

 

In total, 24 students from the University of Nebraska and Peru State College will be serving 11 rural Nebraska communities this summer. Get student bios and project details at http://ruralfutures.nebraska.edu/2018Serviceship.

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Catch Up With Chuck is Facebook Live series with Rural Futures Institute Founding Executive Director Chuck Schroeder. Airing most Thursdays at 11:15 a.m. (CST) on RFI’s Facebook Page, Chuck uses this time to discuss critical rural topics and the latest about RFI while answering viewers’ questions. Stay in touch with Catch Up With Chuck and the Rural Futures Institute through Facebook and Twitter. We will be back soon with another episode looking at rural people and places, success stories, innovators, thinkers and doers who are making rural communities a legitimate best choice for worthwhile living.

 

NU Interior Design Students Create Projects To Attract Creative Class Throughout Rural Nebraska

UNL Architecture students focused their studio projects on rural communities across Nebraska, including: Plattsmouth, Ord, Valentine, Cozad, Memphis, Firth, Brownville, Hickman, Filley, Stapleton, Ogallala, Holdrege, Franklin, Kimball, Brule, Gibbon, Pender and Johnson Lake.

Chuck Schroeder, Founding Executive Director of the Rural Futures Institute (RFI), helped 26 College of Architecture students at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln with their spring 2018 studio projects aimed at rural places.

Each student developed an interior design proposal focused on investing in a rural community and using interior design to attract the creative class in the rural areas of Nebraska and beyond. The students, led by Interior Design Lecturer Stacy Spale, examined rural Nebraska communities and typologies, as well as underutilized spaces across the state.

With Chuck’s help, the students researched opportunities for interior design in rural communities across Nebraska. The students were then challenged to investigate the creative class and discover what relationships and opportunities between this demographic and rural areas. Through problem-based exploration, students positioned the interior built environment with informed inquiry and answered the question of how designers can reactivate abandoned, rural space typologies to either generate or attract the creative class. Several of their projects are featured below.

 

The Ogallala Collective

Amanda VanBuren | Ogallala, Neb.

Studio 446

Madeline Payne | Plattsmouth, Neb.

District 160

Taylor Johnson | Firth, Neb.

The Beyond

Megan Jespersen | Memphis, Neb.

Kreativ Hub

Mackenzie Klein | Cozad, Neb.

Experiential Ed

Megan Warbalow | I-80, Neb.

Creator’s Campus

Savannah Scoville | Pender, Neb.

“As we prepare our students to become 21st century leaders who can solve complex problems between people and space, we decided to take a different teaching approach.”

-Stacy Spale

 

Spale and Mackenzie Klein, one of the students involved with studio, joined Chuck for an episode of Catch Up With Chuck to discuss the opportunities for design to invest in a community, attract specific demographics and revitalize rural areas.

If you would like to see your community’s project and it is not featured, please contact ruralfutures@nebraska.edu.

NEWS RELEASE: Fellows Elected to Great Plains Board of Governors

LINCOLN, Neb. — May 8, 2018 — Two fellows from the Rural Futures Institute (RFI) at the University of Nebraska have been elected as members of the Board of Governors for The Center for Great Plains Studies.

The fellows, who will serve three-year terms beginning Sept. 2018, include:

Bree Dority, Ph.D.

Associate Dean, College of Business
University of Nebraska at Kearney

 


Kim Wilson

Professor, Landscape Architecture
University of Nebraska–Lincoln

The Board of Governors provides advice to the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and the Director of the Center for the operation, program priorities, and budgetary matters of the Center for Great Plains Studies. The Board represents all four University of Nebraska campuses, covers a wide range of academic disciplines, and has four standing committees: Academic, Administrative, Nominating and Museum and Outreach.

Dority and Wilson will be joining RFI Faculty Fellow Jessica Shoemaker, J.D., who has been on the Board of Governors since 2016.

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