The Great Plains: In Focus Webinar Series

The Great Plains: In Focus Webinar Series

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Starting January 13, 2016, the Rural Business Program at the University of Texas at San Antonio – Institute for Economic Development is teaming up with the University of Nebraska, Sam Houston State University and the University of Minnesota to bring you a quality rural webinar series.

This no-cost webinar series will focus on positive trends impacting the Great Plains states from Minnesota to Texas and places in-between. This monthly series will be offered to local elected officials, economic development specialists, housing agencies, and others engaged in rural development practices. These webinars are educational in focus and will lead up to the Minnesota Symposium on Small Towns June 8-9, 2016 and the Texas Rural Challenge on June 9-10, 2016.

Save the Dates

All webinar times are Noon – 1pm Central.

January 13 – Welcome: Rewriting the Rural Narrative

It seems the rural story has already been told. Small towns keep getting smaller.  Churches, schools, clinics, businesses, and now post offices, have closed their doors as the lucky few migrate out to the big cities. This deficit framework dominates how we discuss and envision our rural communities. However, the story of rural America since 1970 is rich and diverse, with positive trends occurring under the radar. Learn how these important positive changes have been occurring across the rural landscape that require us to rewrite the narrative of rural community change.

February 24 – Brain Gain of the Newcomers to Rural America

The population of rural America has changed significantly during the past 40 years, which is commonly referred to as the rural rebound. Nationally, the rural population has increased by 11% since 1970. While retirement and recreational counties account for the bulk of this population growth, the story of rural population change is interesting and nuanced – especially when we consider that 40% of all people move to a new home in any five year span. Since 1970 there have been newcomers aged 30-49 moving into small towns, which positively impacts our social and economic structures. At the same time, there is a new urbanity found across the rural landscape that changes how we look at urban-rural interactions. The next 15-20 years appears to be a great opportunity for American small towns, as a once tight housing supply begins to open up through the changing residential preferences of the retiring baby boomer generation. Overall, as we look to the future, the implications of these changes are positive ones for all of our small towns and open country places.

March 2 – Leadership Demands in Rural America

How many people do we need to run our small towns? How many leaders are available?  These simple, but related, questions are seldom (if ever) asked. There is an expectation that public offices and community organizations will be able to find enough people to serve year after year. These leadership demands of community can be compared to the number of residents (supply) available to serve in a community. This “social organizational infrastructure” is a critical component of rural communities and must be maintained. On one hand a large number of community organizations can reflect a healthy diversity of social options for residents. On the other hand it is a challenge for organizations that depend on the finite talent, time, volunteers, and financial resources of these residents to survive. The changing patterns of social involvement, and the impact this has on current community groups, will also be discussed.

April 6 – Baby Boomers and the Rural Housing Supply

The discussion around workforce housing shortages is a narrow view of a complex continuum of residential housing dynamics. The baby boomer generation recently began expressing their residential preferences across America and the implications for rural communities can be profound. As rural communities have a greater proportion of those in this demographic group, we must explore the supply challenges, as well as the demand opportunities, this trend presents for small towns and rural places over the next 20 years.

May 4 – Rural Entrepreneurship and the Quest for an Empowered Rural Economy

Community support of entrepreneurial talent and interest among rural youth and adults has become a popular strategy for economic development. So, what constitutes entrepreneurial activity in a rural setting and how do we track entrepreneurial numbers and outcomes? How are self-employment and proprietorships understood in the context of a “1099 economy?” The answer goes beyond simply counting businesses. In this session we will consider the concept of rural entrepreneurship and examine the data resources that contribute to our understanding of entrepreneurship in the economy of the Great Plains.  We will also examine the ways that entrepreneurs support unique, differentiable local economies, and how local culture, history, and leadership can impact local entrepreneurial success – positively or negatively.  Finally, we will examine some simple strategies for supporting local entrepreneurship in rural areas in which anyone can take part.

June 1 – Great Plains Opinions and Attitudes

How one measures success in rural development is generally seen as being quite straight-forward. If job and population numbers increase, then development must be occurring. But, if the goal of development goes beyond growth to enhance quality of life for rural people and places, then public opinion should logically be part of the equation. What do rural residents see as important indicators of their community’s success? What development strategies do they see as being important? How are the community level changes that occur with the success of traditional development models received by the people who live in those places? Both Nebraska and Texas have polled rural residents on these and other questions that are relevant to understanding rural development and, in this session, we will consider the results of those polls.

Registration

Please RSVP via this link: http://z.umn.edu/greatplainswebinar

Virtual seating is limited and registration will close on January 8. Links to webinars will be provided the day before each session.

Program Presenters

 

Webinar: Facilitating Rural Dev. in the greater Great Lakes Region

Facilitating Rural Development in the greater Great Lakes Region:

Development of a regional collaborative to support sustainable hops production

January 14, 2016 | 12:00 PM Eastern Time | http://ncrcrd.adobeconnect.com/ncrcrd

About the Webinar

This webinar will provide an overview of the formation of the Great Lakes Hops Working Group, a collaborative consisting of hop educators and researchers working in the Midwest and Canada under similar climatic conditions. The GLHWG and key stakeholders convened and participated in a facilitated needs assessment to identify areas where hop grower resources are needed and formed expertise teams to address identified needs.  The GLHWG continues to share hop resources through monthly conference calls, regional conferences, and multiple collaborative grant-funded projects to improve hop production across the North Central and North Eastern United States. 

Presenter

Dr. Rob Sirrine, Michigan State University Extension.  Dr. Sirrine is a Community Food Systems Educator with MSU Extension. He provides statewide leadership for hops research, education, and outreach.

Registration 

There is no registration and no fee for attending this webinar.

To join the webinar go to http://ncrcrd.adobeconnect.com/ncrcrd, “enter as a guest” is by default already chosen. Type your name into the text box provided, and click on “Enter Room”. You are now in the meeting room for the webinar.

To facilitate Q&A’s, participants submit questions/comments via the Chat Function in Adobe Connect.

The webinar will be recorded and archived at http://ncrcrd.msu.edu/ncrcrd/chronological_archive.

To receive these announcements directly, or to correct errors in our distribution list, please email soliz@anr.msu.edu.

2016 Research & Engagement Request for Proposals

Rural Futures Institute Competitive Awards Program
2016 Research & Engagement Proposals


All proposals must be electronically uploaded as a single PDF document to http://ruralfutures.nebraska.edu/2016REaward

Proposal deadline: March 15, 2016, 4:00 PM CST
Award notification: June 15, 2016
Starting date: July 1, 2016

Download R&E RFP Submit R&E Proposal

Download PDF Version »

Scope: Up to four awards will be made with $100,000 maximum per award. The project time period will not exceed 24 months.

If you have questions about the submission process, please contact Kim Peterson at kpeterson@nebraska.edu or call 402-472-9287.


 I. BACKGROUND 

The University of Nebraska is committed to establishing a transformative Rural Futures Institute (RFI) The RFI vision, mission and core values are the fundamental underpinnings for this request for proposals.

Vision
The RFI will be a locally, nationally and internationally recognized leader focused on increasing community capacity as well as the confidence of rural people to address their challenges and opportunities, resulting in resilient and sustainable rural futures. 

Mission
Through a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship, the Rural Futures Institute mobilizes the diverse resources of the University of Nebraska and its partners to support rural communities and regions in building upon their unique strengths and assets to achieve their desired futures. 

Core Values
The work commissioned and supported by the RFI must be guided by the Institute’s core values: Bold, Transdisciplinary, Innovative, Agile, Collaborative, and Reflective

 II. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The purpose of the RFI Competitive Awards Program is to foster the development of research and engagement work that addresses critical challenges and opportunities facing rural areas. These awards are to function as “seed grants” that are designed to lay the foundation for grant requests to funding sources external to the University of Nebraska or sustainable funding through other mechanisms such as fees and contracts.

Although all of the core values underpin this Competitive Awards Program, successful proposals must explicitly address transdisciplinary and collaborative considerations both internal and external to the University. Transdisciplinary research uses a research strategy that crosses many disciplinary boundaries to create a holistic approach. Additionally, if the RFI is to be successful, it must create an environment in which deep and meaningful collaborative partnerships are the norm: across campuses; across departments and disciplines; and with external stakeholders such as other non-University campuses, communities, state and local government, trade associations, civic groups and the philanthropic community. These collaborative partnerships are the essence of engaged research or “engagement.” Engaged research establishes reciprocal relationships of mutual respect and understanding. The mindset and attitude must be one of doing research “with the community”, rather than doing research “for the community” or “to the community.” Finally, proposals are expected to be innovative and bold in their proposed action, partnerships and outcomes.

It is important to note that the issues facing rural areas include economic considerations but not to the exclusion of other equally important considerations. Basic human services such as health care and education present both challenges and opportunities to rural people and places. Even broader considerations are the natural environment and the civic, cultural, design and artistic aspect of human and community development that cannot easily be counted and measured, nor justified only in terms of economic returns. This competitive awards program encourages proposals in which progress and viability are defined by the triple bottom line of economic, social and environmental considerations.

III. ELIGIBLE APPLICANTS 

  • University faculty and staff as well as Nebraska community members and non-NU higher education faculty/staff are welcome to apply, however, either the Principal Investigator (PI) or a co-Principal Investigator (co-PI) must be affiliated with NU and take responsibility for administering the award funds.
  • Collaboration with partners external to the University of Nebraska is strongly encouraged.
  • An individual may serve as the PI for only one proposal but may serve as a (co-PI) on one or more proposals.

IV. REVIEW PROCESS 

Proposals will be reviewed by a panel that will include both academic and non-academic representation. This panel will prioritize applications for funding based upon the criteria provided in Sections V and IX of this RFP. Final approval of proposals to be funded will be made by the Executive Director of the Rural Futures Institute.

V. SELECTION CRITERIA 

  1. Potential to result in contributions to and measurable outcomes consistent with the RFI vision and mission.
  2. Compatibility with the RFI core values, especially transdisciplinary, collaborative, innovative and bold considerations.
  3. Potential to increase competitiveness for future external funding that is consistent with the vision and mission of the RFI.
  4. Matching funds are not required but may increase the likelihood a proposal will be selected for funding.

VI. EXPECTATIONS 

Those proposals ultimately funded will have certain expectations of the PI and the key personnel including the following:

  • Participation in a working group composed of RFI grant recipients. It is anticipated this group will meet at least once per academic year to share ‘best practices’ and lessons learned around innovative and creative processes and strategies unique to the research and engagement work undertaken.
  • Recipients are expected to demonstrate sharing their insights and findings at a variety of appropriate venues including conferences, such as the Rural Futures Conference, and refereed publications.
  • Recipients are expected to actively pursue external funding sources and submit a proposal for external funding within 24 months following the initial RFI award. Failure to do so may disqualify the applicant from future RFI funding competitions.
  • A final report is required and due to the RFI no later than one month following the conclusion of the project.

VII. FUNDING LIMITATIONS 

Funds may be used for wages and salaries of faculty and staff (provided the award is not used to generate salary savings), graduate and undergraduate students and other key personnel; as well as operating expenses such as databases, supplies and travel that are directly related to the project. Funds may not be used for any of the following purposes:

  • Indirect costs
  • To replace current funding*;
  • Remodeling, renovation or construction;
  • Recruitment or start-up packages for new hires; and
  • Items for purposes not exclusive to the project, such as desktop or laptop computers, printers, software and related accessories and general office supplies.

* In general, RFI funding cannot be used to replace current salary funding. Exceptions can be made if the salary savings are needed to backfill positions that allow the PI or other team members to meet current program commitments. Summer salary or positions funded with “soft” dollars are allowed. Exceptions should be explained in the Budget Justification section.

VIII. PROPOSAL SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS AND APPLICATION FORMAT: 

The entire proposal must be submitted as a single PDF document. Please use single spacing and Times New Roman (or similar) 11-point font with one-inch margins on the title page, abstract and narrative. The proposal, including the required administrative approval form, must be received via email at ruralfutures.nebraska.edu/2016REaward by 4 p.m. (Central time) on Tuesday, March 15, 2016.

Each completed proposal will include the following eight components in order: 

  1. Title Page Information (entered online, required for submission) 
    • Project Title
    • Total RFI Funding Requested ($)
    • Principal Investigator (name, title, affiliation, telephone, email)
    • Co-Principal Investigator(s) (name, title, affiliation, telephone, email)
    • Other Partners (if applicable)
  2. Research and Engagement Proposal: Administrative Approval Form – signed (1 page) (See A-1)
    The person who signs this form should be the PI or co-PI from the University of Nebraska who will administer the award funds. Include his/her campus address as well as the PI or co-PI signature. It also requires signatures of the appropriate campus administrators, verifying submission approval.
  3. Abstract (1/2 page – abstract on separate page from project narrative)
    Summarize the purpose, importance, expected outcomes and key activities/milestones of the proposal.
  4. Project Narrative: (6-page maximum)
    1. The project narrative is limited to six single-spaced pages, using Times New Roman (or similar) 11-point font and one-inch margins
    2. The project narrative should include the following:
      • Context/Justification: Provide the background/rationale for the project, including why the topic/scope is critical to the future of rural areas, and its linkage to the RFI’s vision and mission. What is the underlying need, problem or opportunity that the proposal addresses? How does the project consider the triple bottom line of economic, social and environmental considerations?
      • Ultimate Long-Term Impact (one sentence): If the objectives of this proposal are successfully completed, what could potentially be different ten years from now in rural areas of Nebraska and beyond?
      • Project Objective(s): What specific objective(s) will be reached at the end of the grant period?
      • Methodology and Time Line: Explain the methodology and associated time line of the methodological steps that will be undertaken to insure that the project objectives are met in a timely and successful fashion. Explicitly address how the tools, results, applications, findings, innovations or processes will be shared with both the academic and non-academic communities, including rural people and places.
      • Partnerships: What new University partnerships will be established through this project with: (a) organizations, institutions and agencies external to NU, and (b) specific communities? What are the roles and responsibilities of each partner? What groundwork has already been laid and what else will be needed to insure that these partnerships function effectively? Will these partnerships be sustained beyond the award’s lifetime?
      • Project Success: What does success look like and how will it be measured?
      • Beyond the Project: If this project proposal is successful, what might be the next logical steps and subsequent opportunities, including other funding opportunities?
      • Identifying and Managing Adversity: Obstacles and barriers are often encountered in the implementation and execution of new projects. What do you anticipate will be the most challenging aspect of executing your proposal and what are some steps that can be taken to minimize this challenge or are there alternative ways of moving the project forward if the obstacle is insurmountable?Note: References cited in the Context/Justification section are included in the 6-page limit.
  5. Budget Table(s) (1 or 2 pages) and Budget Justification (1 page)
    Budget detail must be provided in the attached budget table(s) for Year One and, if applicable, Year Two. The budget tables (A2a and A2b) must be accompanied by a budget justification (no more than one page) which explains expenditures in each budget category. Budget lines for Year 1 and Year 2 may be combined in the budget justification narrative.
  6. Biographical Sketch or Vitae of PI and Key Personnel (2 pages per person)
    Not to exceed two pages per person.
  7. Letters of Commitment
    If the success of the proposal is linked to agencies, organizations or institutions external to the University of Nebraska, include letters of commitment from the relevant agencies, organizations or institutions. The letters should specify clearly what the role and nature of the commitment is. NOTE: these are NOT letters of support in which external stakeholders indicate their support for the proposal. The latter type of letter is not to be included.
  8. Waiver of Access to Reviewer’s Assessment – signed (1 page)
    The Principal Investigator (PI) submitting the proposal is required to sign the attached form (see A-3) on behalf of the team, waiving all access to the assessment of reviewers. A proposal without a completed waiver form will be returned. After funding decisions are made, anonymous reviewer comments will be forwarded to the principal investigator.

IX. CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION 

Following is the list of criteria by which the research proposals will be evaluated (see A-4):

  • Transdisciplinary, collaborative, innovative and bold (20 points)
  • The context/justification (15 points)
  • Short-term considerations/meeting project objectives (20 points)
  • Long-term considerations (10 points)
  • Project administration (20 points)
  • Budget considerations (15 points)

X. SUBMISSION DATE 

Proposals, including administrative approval signatures, must be received as a single PDF at ruralfutures.nebraska.edu/2016REaward by 4 p.m. (Central time) on Tuesday, March 15, 2016. Proposals received after this deadline will be returned to the applicant without review.

If you have questions about the submission process, please contact Kim Peterson at kpeterson@nebraska.edu or call 402-472-9287.

XI. POST AWARD MANAGEMENT AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS 

Principal investigators will be required to submit project reports on behalf of their teams to the Rural Futures Institute. Reports will be required every six months and final reports will be required 30 days after the end of the project.

2016 Teaching & Engagement Request for Proposals

Rural Futures Institute Competitive Awards Program
2016 Teaching & Engagement Development Awards
Request for Proposals


All proposals must be electronically uploaded as a single PDF document to http://ruralfutures.nebraska.edu/2016TEaward

Proposal deadline: March 1, 2016, 4:00 PM CST
Award notification: June 1, 2016
Starting date: July 1, 2016

Download T&E RFP Submit T&E Proposal

Scope: Up to five awards will be made with $20,000 maximum per award. The project time period will not exceed 24 months. Each program/project/course must be delivered twice during the two years.

If you have questions about the submission process, please contact Kim Peterson kpeterson@nebraska.edu or call 402-472-9287.


 I. BACKGROUND 

The University of Nebraska is committed to establishing a transformative Rural Futures Institute (RFI). The RFI vision, mission and core values are the fundamental underpinnings for this request for proposals.

Vision
The RFI will be a locally, nationally and internationally recognized leader focused on increasing community capacity as well as the hope and confidence of rural people to address their challenges and opportunities, resulting in resilient and sustainable futures. 

Mission
Through a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship, the RFI mobilizes the diverse resources of the University of Nebraska and its partners to support rural communities and regions in building upon their unique strengths and assets to achieve their desired futures. 

Core Values
The work commissioned and supported by the RFI must be guided by the Institute’s core values: Bold Transdisciplinary Innovative Agile Collaborative and Reflective

 II. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The purpose of the RFI Teaching & Engagement Competitive Awards Program is to foster the development of civic engagement in both students and community partners. Inherent to the vision, mission, and core values of the RFI, the awards program particularly encourages rural community members in partnership with higher education institutions to seek funding that results in college students involvement in providing services to help meet the community’s needs. Faculty and staff seeking funding should ensure that any civic engagement or service learning endeavor integrates meaningful student service experiences into the curriculum and, in the case of service learning, builds curriculum-based reflection activities to enhance student learning. The RFI will assist in identifying potential partners, if asked.

Project proposals must focus on involving students in one or more of the following areas:

  1. Civic Engagement
    Implement civic engagement efforts into new or existing programs to develop RFI core values in both communities and partnering campuses. For example, involving partners in recruitment/retention programs; creating learning communities that include civic engagement in the design; establishing diversity initiatives that explicitly link active and collaborative community-based teaching and learning with the academic success of underrepresented students or internship programs in rural communities. Community partners are particularly encouraged to seek, in conjunction with participating campuses or institutions of higher education, funding for the civic engagement portion of the teaching and learning award funding.
  2. Undergraduate and Graduate Service Learning
    Applicants must enhance curriculum by designing new course(s) or revising an existing course(s) with a partner agency to include a service learning component. Service learning is a transformational pedagogy that integrates service in the community with academic study. Faculty, in partnership with community representatives, design service learning projects based on two main objectives:

  3. Undergraduate and Graduate Student Community-based Research
    Applicants must develop and initiate a community-based research project focused on advancing the field of civic engagement through service learning by addressing a community identified need/issue.

III. ELIGIBLE APPLICANTS 

  • University faculty and staff as well as Nebraska community members and non-NU higher education faculty/staff are welcome to apply, however, either the Principal Investigator (PI) or a co-Principal Investigator (co-PI) must be affiliated with NU and take responsibility for administering the grant funds.
  • Collaboration with partners external to the University of Nebraska is strongly encouraged.
  • An individual may serve as the PI for only one proposal but may serve as a (co-PI) on one or more proposals.

IV. REVIEW PROCESS 

Proposals will be reviewed by a panel that will include representation from the University of Nebraska’s four campuses who have expertise in service learning, civic engagement, and a clear understanding of the vision, mission and core values of the RFI. The panel will prioritize applications for funding based upon the selection criteria provided in Section V of this RFP. Final selections will be made by the RFI Executive Director.

V. SELECTION CRITERIA 

  1. Potential to result in contributions to and measurable outcomes consistent with the RFI vision and mission.
  2. Compatibility with the RFI core values, especially reflective and collaborative.
  3. Potential for student learning, addressing rural community needs/issues, advancing the field of civic engagement, and advancing professional development of the applicants.
  4. Potential for establishing and sustaining the program/project/course(s) to continue after the grant period.
  5. Matching funds are not required but may increase the likelihood of funding success. 

VI. EXPECTATIONS 

Those proposals ultimately funded will have certain expectations of the PI and the key personnel including the following:

  • Recipients are expected to participate in a working group composed of the RFI Teaching & Engagement award recipients. It is anticipated that group will gather at least once a year to share ‘best practices’ around innovative and creative processes and strategies unique to engaged teaching.
  • Recipients are expected to conduct their program/project/course during both years of the project.
  • Recipients are expected to demonstrate impact by sharing their research at a number of venues including conferences, such as the Rural Futures Conference, and in refereed publications.
  • A final report is required and due to the RFI no later than one month following the conclusion of funding.

VII. FUNDING LIMITATIONS 

Funds may be used for wages and salaries of faculty and staff (provided the award is not used to generate salary savings), graduate and undergraduate students and other key personnel, as well as operating expenses such as databases, supplies and travel that are directly related to the project. Funds may not be used for any of the following purposes:

  • To replace current funding;
  • Remodeling, renovation or construction;
  • Recruitment or start-up packages for new hires; and
  • Items for purposes not exclusive to the project, such as desktop or laptop computers, iPads, printers, software and related accessories and general office supplies.

VIII. PROPOSAL SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS AND APPLICATION FORMAT: 

Go to http://ruralfutures.nebraska.edu/2016TEaward to:

  • Enter title page information using the online form
  • Upload proposal information as a single PDF document

Title Page Information: (entered online, required for submission) 

  1. Title
  2. Total Request Amount ($)
  3. Principal Investigator
    • Name
    • Affiliation
    • Telephone
    • Email
  4. Co-Principal Investigator(s)
    • Name
    • Affiliation
    • Telephone
    • Email
  5. Other Partners (if applicable)

Proposal Information: (upload as a single PDF document)

  1. Project Description: (three pages)
    • The project description is limited to three single-spaced pages, using Times New Roman (or similar) 11-point font and one-inch borders in a PDF format.
    • The project description should describe the proposed program/project/course(s) as it relates to one or more of the following three focus areas, clearly addressing the issues listed in the area below that will be the focus of the project. The plan must include a project timeline.
      1. Undergraduate and Graduate Service Learning 
        • Include a course description and learning outcomes.
        • Provide a clear rationale for why and how service learning should be integrated into the course(s).
        • Describe the reflection activities that clearly link the service experience with the learning objectives of the course.
        • Provide evidence for the sustainability of the course after the grant period ends.
      2. Undergraduate and Graduate Student Research 
        • Describe the community-based project.
        • Describe how the project integrates with teaching and professional service.
        • Describe student roles in the project and the reflective activities structured to link the service experience with the learning.
        • Provide evidence for project sustainability.
        • Describe how the results will be communicated.
      3. Civic Engagement 
        • Include a description of the engagement program and expected outcomes (recruitment/retention rates, diversity focused learning objectives, etc.).
        • Provide a clear rationale for why and how the engagement activities are integrated into the program.
        • Provide evidence for the sustainability of the program after the grant period ends.
    • List the project’s long-term and short-term goals related to:
      • Student learning;
      • Furthering institutional and departmental goals toward institutionalization of civic engagement and service learning;
      • Addressing community needs/issues;
      • Advancing the field of civic engagement and service learning as the pedagogy of engagement; and
      • Community partnerships including the role of community representatives in the design and implementation of the program/project/course(s).Note: References cited in Project Description are included in the three-page limit and should conform to an accepted journal format.
  2. Project Budget: (one page)
    Provide a one-page budget in which personnel and operating expenditures are identified and explained.
  3. Biographical Materials: (two pages per person)
    Provide up to a two-page biographical sketch/vitae for each key personnel.

If you have questions about the submission process, please contact Kim Peterson kpeterson@nebraska.edu or call 402-472-9287.

Webinar: Fostering Cross Disciplinary Research on Energy Development

Fostering Cross Disciplinary Research on Energy Development

Thursday, December 10, 2015 – 12:00 PM Eastern Time

About the Webinar

Funded by the National Science Foundation and led by a cross-disciplinary committee of faculty from research institutions across North America, the Energy Impacts Research Coordination Network seeks to overcome topical, disciplinary, and geographic silos in order to facilitate breakthroughs in understanding the social and community impacts of energy development. This webinar will provide an introduction to the 3-year project, outlining the rationale, goals, and major project objectives, as well as solicit ideas and feedback from webinar participants on ways to increase cross-disciplinary social science research on energy.

Presenters

Dr. Jeffrey B. Jacquet is an assistant professor in the department of Sociology and Rural Studies at South Dakota State University.  Dr. Jacquet has performed social and economic impact analyses of unconventional oil and gas development since 2005, and has performed sociological analysis of energy development in areas across the U.S, and has worked with a number of universities and Extension agencies.  Current research projects include measuring the migration intentions of rural residents and understanding ownership structures of large scale wind energy. He attained his PhD from Cornell University in 2012.

Dr. Julia Haggerty is a human geographer focused on interactions between natural resource use and the social and economic well-being of rural communities. She is a faculty member in Montana State University’s Earth Science Department and holds a joint appointment with the Montana Institute on Ecosystems. Prior to joining the Earth Sciences Department in the fall of 2013, she worked for five years as a policy analyst for the regional non-profit research group Headwaters Economics. Haggerty’s current research projects include a USDA NIFA-funded project on community economies and energy development, a project on community resilience and wildlife restoration on Fort Peck Reservation, and research on ranchland ownership dynamics in the Northern Great Plains.

Anne Junod is a PhD student studying Sociology at South Dakota State University.  Anne is interested in the impacts of community perceptions of and responses to social and environmental changes and her research interests include rural sociology, environmental sociology, and migration.  Prior to beginning her graduate studies, Anne worked in public advocacy on the issues of immigration, child abuse, and homelessness.

Registration

There is no registration and no fee for attending this webinar.

To join the webinar go to http://ncrcrd.adobeconnect.com/ncrcrd, “enter as a guest” is by default already chosen. Type your name into the text box provided, and click on “Enter Room”. You are now in the meeting room for the webinar.

To facilitate Q&A’s, participants submit questions/comments via the Chat Function in Adobe Connect.

The webinar will be recorded and archived at http://ncrcrd.msu.edu/ncrcrd/chronological_archive.

To receive these announcements directly, or to correct errors in our distribution list, please email soliz@anr.msu.edu.

Becoming a Small Giant

Becoming a Small Giant

February 17, 2016 | 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM
Nebraska Champions Club | Lincoln, NE

Join a discussion about the ideas discovered in the book “Small Giants” by Bo Burlingham. Please read before attending.

Headliners

Paul Spiegelman, Chief Culture Officer, Stericycle
Tom Walter, Founder, Tasty Catering

Why Attend?

  1. Connect with other values driven business leaders
  2. Learn what it means to be a great (not just big) company
  3. Participate with inspirational and acclaimed business leaders

More Information »

Event Flyer »

Register Online »

 

Webinar: Health Insurance in the Agricultural Sector

C-FARE-NCRCRD Webinar: Health Insurance in the Agricultural Sector

December 11 at 12 PM ET

The 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act altered incentives for how individuals and employers engage in the health care market. Two researchers will discuss how health insurance availability and coverage impacts farm households and  farmer, rancher, extension workers, and technical assistant decisions. Participants will hear how health insurance influences farmers’ decisions to invest, expand and grow their enterprises; contributes to workforce vitality; and impacts farm enterprises given insurance market variability across states. Some review of the impact of the law on the structure of agriculture will be discussed. This is an interactive webinar so participants will be able to raise issues and ask questions.

  • Moderator: Scott Loveridge, Professor Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics Michigan State University and Director, NCRCRD
  • Shoshanah Inwood, Rural Sociologist and Assistant Professor in the Department of Community Development and Applied Economics, University of Vermont.
  • Mary Ahearn, Senior Economist, Retired from USDA ERS; Editor of Choices Magazine for the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association; Vice-Chair for the Council on Food, Agriculture, and Resource Economics.

Register Online »

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AGRI/ECO-TOURISM WORKSHOP

AGRI/ECO-TOURISM WORKSHOP

February 22-24, 2016 | Grand Island, Nebraska

SHARE YOUR STORY – 11th ANNUAL WORKSHOP & RESOURCE MARKETPLACE

This year the annual MarketPlace Nebraska is merging with the Agri/Eco-Tourism Workshop to create a stronger networking opportunity. In previous years, the MarketPlace Nebraska was hosted by the Center for Rural Affairs to energize and connect entrepreneurs, small business owners, service providers and communities. The 2016 Nebraska Agri/Eco-Tourism workshop will provide those people and more, including, community leaders, landowners, farmers and ranchers, with information on how to establish, finance, market and grow businesses based on agri/eco-tourism and small business partnerships. Participants will come away with fresh marketing ideas, greater financial opportunity and numerous new contacts.

The workshop will kick off with educational B2B tours on Monday. Tuesday’s sessions and events will be at the Raising Nebraska Exhibit in the Nebraska Building on the State Fairgrounds, where all types of breakout sessions will take place, giving folks a chance to learn from a variety of industry professionals and gather information from the Resource MarketPlace. Tuesday night, the Taste and Feel of Nebraska event will give attendees the opportunity to network while sampling local products. Explore the potential for cross-marketing partnerships with others! The workshop will wrap-up with Wednesday sessions at the Grand Theatre in downtown Grand Island.

If you would like to have an exhibit booth or space to showcase your Nebraska foods, beverages, or local made products, contact Karen Kollars at 308-249-3220 or Karen.kollars@nebraska.gov.

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REGISTRATION

Register online or Download Registration Form.

The workshop registration fee covers materials, the Taste & Feel of Nebraska event, meals and breaks on Tuesday and Wednesday. It does not include lodging or the Monday B2B Tours and meal. Your workshop name badge will be your ticket to all functions. Registration fees are listed on the registration form. You may also register online with a credit card at http:/industry.visitnebraska.com. A 5.5% processing fee is required for all online payments.

LODGING

A block of rooms have been reserved at the Midtown Holiday Inn (2503 S. Locust St.) in Grand Island until January 31, 2016. Call 308-384-1330 and ask for the Nebraska Agri/Eco-Tourism block to secure your special room rate of $87.95 (plus tax).

Urban Forest Connections Webinar Series

Remove and Repurpose: Increasing the value of urban wood

Wednesday, December 9, 2015 | 1:00 – 2:15pm ET

Urban wood utilization is a smart use of local resources that can add revenue to an urban forestry program. Many municipalities are encountering an increase in urban tree removals as invasive pests infiltrate their urban forests. Others are simply wondering if there’s a better way to use their urban wood “waste” and avoid a drain on the budget for tree removal. In this webinar, our speakers will share tips and lessons learned to help you start or expand your urban wood use program. Steve Bratkovich will provide a brief overview of urban wood utilization. He will also introduce the concept of industrial clusters, which can be used as a template to get you started or increase the success of your existing program. Dave Gamstetter will share Cincinnati’s experience in developing its Urban Timber program, including how it overcame several challenges. Established in 2007 as a response to the discovery of emerald ash borer in Cincinnati, the Urban Timber program repurposes sustainably harvested municipal logs into affordable, high quality products.

This webinar is open to all. Your RSVP is appreciated, but not required. We are seeking 1.0 CEU with the International Society of Arboriculture. Check our website for updates and to watch recordings of previous webinars.

Contact the Urban Forest Technology & Science Delivery Team at urban@fs.fed.us with questions, feedback, requests for special accommodations, speaker suggestions, or to be added to the mailing list. Please feel free to forward this announcement to interested parties.

Please use the information below to connect to the webinar:

  1. FIRST TIME USERS: MAKE SURE YOU CAN CONNECT
    If you have never attended an Adobe Connect meeting before, test your connection before the webinar. Go to: https://usfs.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm
  1. CONNECT TO THE WEBINAR ON YOUR SYSTEM
    Go to: https://usfs.adobeconnect.com/ucf/
  1. AUDIO
    Broadcast audio through your computer or use the information below to connect via telephone conferencing:
    Toll-free: 1-877-369-5243 or 1-617-668-3633
    Participant code: 0210033
    International dial-in numbers
  1. TROUBLESHOOTING
    Unable to join the meeting? Call Adobe Connect at 1-800-422-3623.
    Need help with telephone conferencing? Call AT&T Connect Support at 1-888-796-6118. 

Please Note: All webinars will be recorded.

www.fs.fed.us/research/urban-webinars/

Innovation In Pedagogy and Technology Symposium

Mark your calendars for May 10, 2016, when the University of Nebraska Innovation in Pedagogy and Technology Symposium takes place in downtown Lincoln, Nebraska.

Sponsored by University of Nebraska Information Technology (UNIT) and University of Nebraska Online Worldwide, this essential event brings together the thinkers and doers who are shaping online and distance education at the University of Nebraska. Through this experience, you will:  

  • Learn from nationally recognized leaders in distance education
  • Share pragmatic insights with colleagues and explore how to implement at the University of Nebraska
  • Expose yourself to new ideas and opportunities to network and collaborate

Attendance is open to the NU community.

Submit your speaking proposal: Share your road-tested insights and strategies in online education. Speaking proposals will be accepted through January 29, 2016.